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Translatable Version of Reopening Plan

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    2022-2023 

     

    The letters in ACPS in dark blue appear above the pages of an open book with the words in dark blue Allegany County Public Schools.

     

                          

    Safe Return to In-Person Instruction and Continuity of Service Plan

     

     

    A blue box that reads Message From The Superintendent.

     

     

    Planning for the reopening of Allegany County Public Schools requires collaboration with many stakeholders. Throughout the planning process and during the upcoming months, we will continue to follow guidance from Governor Larry Hogan and State Superintendent of Schools, as well as from the Maryland Department of Health, the Center for Disease Control, and the Allegany County Health Department. Adjustments to the Reopening Plan will be made as needed based on their guidance and recommendations.

     

         Mr. Jeffrey S. Blank, Superintendent of Schools

     

     

     

     

    Board of Education

     

    • Mrs. Crystal M. Bender, President
    • Mr. Robert S. Farrell, Vice President
    • Dr. David A. Bohn, Board Member
    • Ms. Debra L. Frank, Board Member
    • Mrs. Tammy M. Fraley, Board Member

     

     

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Board of Education                                                                                                                                              2

    ACPS Communication Plan                                                                                                                              6

    Stakeholder Feedback                                                                                                                                      7

    Transportation                                                                                                                                                      9

    Seating on the Bus                                                                                                                                           9

    Transportation Options for Students                                                                                                              9

    School Bus Safety and Inspections                                                                                                              10

    Bus Driver Training                                                                                                                                       10

    Cleaning and Disinfecting                                                                                                                            11

    2022-2023 Assessments to Identify Achievement Gaps                                                                             11

    Implementation Plan                                                                                                                                          20

    Academics, Equity, and Accountability                                                                                                        29

           Educational Equity                                                                                                                                       29  

    Instructional Expectations                                                                                                                               32

    Ensuring Communication, Professional Learning, and Resources which Promote Integration of the PreK-12 State Frameworks   33

    School Climate & Culture                                                                                                                               35

    Student Support Services and Mental Health                                                                                             36

    Interscholastic Athletics                                                                                                                                   37

    Special Education                                                                                                                                              37

    Roles and Responsibilities of Special Educators and Related Service Providers                                 39

    Students with Complex Medical Needs/Underlying Health Conditions                                                39

    Attendance                                                                                                                                                          40

    Attendance Procedures                                                                                                                                  41

    Monitoring Problems/Consequences of Absenteeism                                                                              42

    COVID 19 Attendance Collection and Recording- Key Considerations and Frequently Asked Questions.     44

    Operations Safety Protocols                                                                                                                            45

    Cleaning/Disinfecting/Sanitizing                                                                                                                 45

    Training                                                                                                                                                           45

    Process for Cleaning and Disinfecting of Building                                                                                   46

    Process of Addressing Surfaces, TouchPoints                                                                                           46

    Instructional Staff Cleaning Supplies                                                                                                          46

    Food and Nutrition                                                                                                                                            47

    Addendum                                                                                                                                                           51

    Guidance to Support PK-12 and Decision Tree                                                                                         51

    Appendix                                                                                                                                                              62

     

     

     

     

    2022-2023

     

    The ACPS will resume in-person learning Monday-Friday for the fall 2022-23 school year.

     

    The Board of Education met on Tuesday, August 9, 2022, to review the reopening plan.  The plan was approved by the Board of Education.  There was a section in the Board meeting for constituents/stakeholder feedback.

     

    The ultimate goal of Allegany County Public Schools is to continue to provide face-to-face instruction and keep students in school, thus preventing interruptions in their daily lives while also reducing the spread of the virus within the community. ACPS will implement a variety of strategies for everyday operations to keep students in school, including the promotion of vaccination among teachers and other staff and eligible students. 

    The ACPS is committed to addressing health equity for student groups who are disproportionately affected by COVID 19.  According to the CDC, health equity is achieved when every person has the opportunity to “attain his or her full health potential” and no one is “disadvantaged from achieving this potential because of social position or other socially determined circumstances.”  Health inequalities are reflected in differences in length of life; quality of life; rates of diseases; disability; and death; severity of disease; and access to treatment:  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-mcov/community/health-equity/ Suggested action steps to address health inequities can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/disparities/action.htm.  

    ACPS will continue to follow Maryland Department of Health guidance to support safe in-person operations for Prek-12 schools. The MDH/MSDE Guidance for Covid-19 Symptoms, Isolation, and Quarantine will be utilized for decisions regarding isolation and quarantine.  Please refer to the addendum for a copy of the Guidance document. Staff and students who are in close contact with someone with known or suspected Covid-19 can continue to work in or attend school regardless of vaccination status as long as they are asymptomatic.   Those who can mask should do so for 10 days from the last day of exposure.  A test at 3-5 days after exposure will be recommended. 

     

    The ACPS will continue to collaborate with the local health department, and schools will continue to follow existing procedures for reporting communicable diseases (COMAR 10.06.01).  Schools will notify the local health department when a student or staff member has tested positive for COVID-19.  Schools will communicate the procedures for notifying the school of absences resulting from illness related to COVID-19 symptoms and the requirement for timely pick up of a student who exhibits symptoms while at school.  ACPS tracks all positive cases within the schools and reports outbreaks to the community when they occur. Parents are notified if there are any outbreaks in their child’s classroom or school.

     

    It will remain a priority to maintain healthy school and office facilities with daily cleaning. The ACPS will continue to examine ways to ensure improved ventilation within all buildings. Good hand hygiene is still a recommendation for general health considerations. Staff and students should continue washing or sanitizing hands routinely, especially before eating.

     

    Staff or students who are exhibiting Covid-19 symptoms should not attend work or school.  Covid-19 testing will be recommended, and the ACPS will provide at-home test kits to any child or staff member exhibiting Covid-19 symptoms. Those with a negative test may return when symptoms have improved, and they are fever free for 24 hours without the use of medication.  Individuals can choose to wear a mask based on personal preference or informed by personal level of risk to themselves or their household and social contacts.  ACPS supports voluntary masking for any reason. If a student becomes ill during the school day they will be moved to the health room and separated from well persons.  Students will wear a well fitting mask, and wait in a designated area for pick up from a family member.

     

    Universal contact tracing will not occur in the school setting.  Contact tracing will occur in the event of an outbreak. During an outbreak common control measures may be recommended on a temporary basis.

     

    Appropriate accommodations will be made for children with disabilities with respect to health and safety policies.

     

     

    ACPS Communication Plan


    The Board of Education affirms the need and obligation to keep the citizens of Allegany County apprised of accurate information regarding the Allegany County Public School System (ACPS) and recognizes the importance of effective means of communication with the general public. The Board of Education invites and welcomes the active participation of the news media in the ACPS.

     

    The release of information concerning the school system shall be coordinated by the Superintendent and the Office of Public Information. Principals shall consult with the Superintendent and the Office of Public Information prior to releasing any information to the news media.

     

    The Superintendent, Chief Academic Officer, and designated staff may communicate with the public through a variety of methods, including, but not limited to, television, radio, newspapers, magazines, telephone, email, text message, and the ACPS web and social media sites.

     

    The Office of Public Information is responsible, at the direction of the Superintendent, for disseminating information about the ACPS. All information published by staff in the Central Office for general distribution to the public or to the news media is prepared in cooperation with the Office of Public Information. The Office of Public Information maintains contact with the news media, the staff of the school system, and the citizens of the county, and provides accurate and current information about the school system. All official media releases must be authorized by the Superintendent or his/her designee and shall be issued in the name of the Superintendent. The Superintendent, Public Information Officer or designee will communicate information pertaining to the Allegany County Public School system on social media sites.

     

    The ACPS regards school safety as its first priority. ACPS works closely with all applicable public law enforcement and emergency agencies. The school system has developed comprehensive procedures that cover a wide variety of emergencies that serve as a guide to employees and students, public safety partners, and the general public. When an emergency occurs in a school or office (fire, accident, assault, etc.) the principal or director immediately informs the Superintendent or his/her designee. The Superintendent’s office notifies the public information officer who works with the principal or director or their designee in coordinating the release of information to the news media and the public. When an emergency occurs, it is critical that accurate information is provided to the public.

     

    The ACPS Public Information Officer is charged with ensuring that communication is shared through approved communication procedures. Communications will be shared through the following avenues to stakeholders and the community through the following methods:

     

    • ACPS District Website
        • Crisis Management Site
        • Videos
        • District Letters/District Newsletters or Flyers (Peachjar), if applicable
        • Board of Education Meetings
      • Direct communication via the Superintendent, Senior Staff, BOE Communication
      • ACPS Blackboard Parent/Staff Notification System
      • Social Media Platforms
        • Facebook
        • Twitter
      • School-Based Information
        • Individual school websites
        • Individual school social media platforms
        • Via ACPS email
        • Direct communication from individual school administrators and teachers
        • ACPS Blackboard Parent/Staff Notification System
        • School Newsletters, if applicable

     

    Stakeholder Feedback

    Soliciting feedback from the representative stakeholder is ongoing through several communication avenues.  Stakeholders have the opportunity to post feedback daily on the Ask ACPS Platform.  In addition, stakeholders have the opportunity to provide input at the monthly Board of Education meetings.  Information regarding stakeholder input/feedback and a sign-up sheet is posted at each monthly Board meeting. Stakeholders may also email or mail input and feedback for the Board meeting.  The President of the Board reads the stakeholder’s feedback during the hearing of constituents.  

    Not all input received is direct feedback to the plan. Sometimes, individuals have offered a general viewpoint on reopening. Some of the feedback received regards cleaning and sanitizing protocols, masking, scheduling, online options, athletics and extracurricular activities, operational procedures, and employment issues and concerns. 

    The ACPS will continue to follow CDC, MDH, and the local ACHD guidance, as well as state or federal mandates, regarding vaccines and/or testing.

     

     

    Questions are answered through a combination of operational procedures or through other types of system communications. For example, questions about employee absences and leave requests will be provided through the office of Human Resources, while instructional questions will be provided through the office of the Chief Academic Officer.  The Public Information Officer (PIO) handles many phone calls and responds to questions asked on the Ask ACPS platform. The PIO directs phone calls and emails to the appropriate staff member to address.  Many procedures already exist within the organization, but some may require an update to reference COVID-19. The Superintendent and/or members of the Board of Education respond to constituent questions or concerns at the Board meetings. 

     

    At a minimum, the Superintendent and Chief Academic Officer meet monthly with certain stakeholder groups such as the senior staff, elementary and secondary supervisors, principals, assistant principals, and the information technology staff to discuss strengths and challenges within the components of the reopening plan implementation.   Principals and supervisors provided feedback to inform revisions to the plan.

    The Human Resources department works very closely with the Allegany County Education Association (ACEA).  Members of the workgroups are provided opportunities to review strategies incorporated into the Reopening Plan and to provide input and feedback at a minimum of each semester- September and January of each year.  A final summative review will take place at the end of the school year.

    Workgroups and Stakeholders for the Reopening Plan

     

    • Superintendent and Policy Committee - Mr. Jeffrey Blank
    • Curriculum and Instruction - Dr. Kim Green Kalbaugh
    • Special Student Populations - Mrs. Debbie Metheny
    • Professional Learning – Mrs. Kate Loughrie
    • CTE Programs - Mr. Joe Brewer and Mr. Richard King
    • Technology – Mr. Rob Pyles and Mr. Todd Canan
    • Human Resources - Mr. Steve Wilson and Mr. Glenn Rice
    • Finance- Mr. Lawrence McKenzie
    • Facilities, Operations, and Transportation - Mr. Jay Marley, Mr. Wally High, Mr. Mike Matthews, and Mr. HB Martz
    • Food, Nutrition, and School Safety - Mr. Todd Lutton and Mr. Anthony Rumgay
    • Athletics - Mrs. Tracey Leonard
    • Equity - Dr. Sarah Welsh

     

    Stakeholders served as active participants in the workgroups listed above. Input was also collected through a parent survey on online learning. Workgroup participants include the following:

     

    • Board of Education Representatives
    • Senior Staff Members
    • Instructional Supervisors
    • Central Office Support Staff
    • School-Based Leaders
    • Parents
    • Students
    • Teachers
    • Allegany County Education Association
    • Public Information Officer

     

    Transportation

     

    Summary

     

    In response to the COVID-19 Virus, online conferences were developed for transportation supervisors and directors in the state of Maryland. The supervisors and directors of transportation for each county in Maryland, along with the State Director of Transportation, meet weekly to discuss the best practices and procedures that would need to be implemented to combat the spread of the Coronavirus.

     

    Seating on the Bus

     

    The school buses used in Allegany County are 66 passenger buses. There are 11 rows of seats on the bus. ACPS encourages the last two seats on the bus to be kept empty, if possible, due to a rear-end collision. The transporting of elementary students allows the capacity to be set at 66 passengers by placing three students to a seat. The transportation department recognizes that this is impractical to achieve and attempts to keep the number of students on the bus to under 58. The standard for students that attend middle school and high school is set between 44 and 48 students. There are no seat belts on the buses for the students. The school buses are designed to utilize compartmentation to help protect students in the event of an accident. It is essential that the students sit in their seats correctly facing forward for this to be effective.

     

    Transportation Options for Students

     

    The mission of the transportation department is to provide safe, efficient, and reliable services for eligible students. Elementary students living more than one (1) mile from the school or bus stop are eligible for transportation services. Secondary (middle and high) students living more than one and one-half (1.5) miles from the school or bus stop are eligible for transportation services. Social distancing will be followed to the greatest extent possible on the bus.  If necessary, modified bus scheduling may be required for students to be safely transported to school if the district has to return to a hybrid model for in-person transportation.

     

    As part of a student’s IEP, transportation may be a service required to be provided under Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE). Given social distancing guidelines, modified bus scheduling will be required for students to be safely transported to school. Although students will only be allowed one student per seat on the bus, siblings will be allowed to sit together.

     

    Normal procedures will be followed for students who are walkers and students who are transported to school by their parents, or for high school students who have completed the application process and who have been approved to drive to school. Students who have been approved to drive to school will be issued parking permits per the regular procedures outlined in each high school’s handbook.

     

    Parents will be encouraged to transport their child to and from school in a personal vehicle to limit the potential for virus exposure and reduce the number of students on ACPS buses.

    Seating will be prioritized for to and only from residential addresses only. No seats may be available for students on out-of-district approval.

     

    School Bus Safety and Inspections

     

    Allegany County Public Schools has its own inspection team made up of professionals related to the field of transportation and heavy equipment diesel mechanics. The team consists of one master inspector, one assistant to the master inspector, two driving/interior inspectors, and one undercarriage and drive train inspector. The transportation department monitors and processes all inspections to the MVA online site. Buses that have failure notices will receive a 30-day notice for repairs to be done on minor issues or removed from service at the time of inspection if there is a major issue. Inspectors from the Maryland State MVA are present for all fall inspections and periodically for other inspection times. The State will also do unannounced random inspections from time to time throughout the school year.

     

    The school buses for ACPS both county-owned and contractor own receive four inspections during the school year. Each new school bus will be given an acceptance inspection to make sure they comply with the specifications set by ACPS and COMAR. On the road buses first will be given a class A inspection. This inspection requires removal of wheels and brake drums to measure clearances along with visual checks of the bus interior and exterior along with suspension, steering, exhaust, and tires and wheels. All school buses will be given three class B inspections throughout the school year, summer, fall, and spring. These inspections are similar to a class A but do not require the wheels and brake drums removed.

     

    Bus Driver Training

     

    School bus driver candidates are required to have eight hours of classroom training and a minimum of nine (9) hours behind-the-wheel training. Candidates will complete a background check through info from past employers and fingerprinting by the state and federal government agencies. A DOT physical will be administered by a DOT certified doctor approved by the ACPS transportation department.

     

    Candidates are placed in the random drug/alcohol pool. All candidates that acquire a positive drug/alcohol test or have a background that is unacceptable by the transportation supervisor will be placed on the State disqualification portal.

     

    Active school bus drivers are required to have 6 hours of in-service training a school year. The drivers receive a yearly physical by our DOT doctor, are placed in the random drug/alcohol drug pool, and a check is done through the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Drug/Alcohol Clearinghouse. Drivers receive an evaluation every two years by the transportation department. The drivers receive training every three years in the area of first aid, and railroad and bridge crossing. The transportation department conducts two school bus evacuation drills a year, one front door and one rear door.

     

    Mitigating the spread of COVID-10 on School Buses

     

    School bus drivers and attendants received training in the best practice to disinfect their bus after each run. High contact areas were identified that need additional treatment. Drivers are required to have their masks in place while students are boarding and departing the bus. In addition, they wear a mask when they exit the bus on school grounds. Bus attendants wear their masks at all times while on the bus and school grounds. Drivers will lower their mask while driving the bus. This will be done to improve the visibility for the driver.

     

    Cleaning and Disinfecting

     

    High contact areas will continue to be a cleaning priority, such as handrails and tops of seats, etc.

    Under normal operations, the buses in Allegany County are cleaned once a week and additionally, if required. Special Needs buses are cleaned more frequently. The cleaning of the bus will be monitored by the driver/owners and performed as needed.

     

    2022-2023 Assessments to Identify Achievement Gaps

    All students will be assessed at the beginning of the 2022-2023 school year. Assessments at the beginning of the year will ensure that schools are capturing current student understanding of concepts that have been taught yet were not understood or retained during the time away from in-school instruction as a result of the COVID-19 school closures and subsequent summer break.  The ACPS will use the assessments listed below to capture baseline data regarding current student understanding.  The district will also use Maryland Report Card data for baseline and trend data.  Pre pandemic results from the 2019 Report Card showed that our elementary schools were particularly making excellent progress in regard to achievement and student growth.  The 2021 fall test and the 2022 MCAP tests will be used for midpoint and end-of-year data points.  Fall 2021 results indicated significant learning gaps which was expected as a result of the pandemic’s effects on achievement and growth.  When we receive the 2022 spring data, we will examine this data to determine the level of growth and extent of gaps that are present.  Our instructional teams will work with school based teams to conduct the 5Whys and Root Cause Analysis Process.  We will continue to implement the MTSS tiers of support for reading, mathematics, and behavior.  Each school will conduct their MTSS Practice Profile administration in the fall of 2022.

    Process to Accelerate Learning and or Provide Support in Recovering Learning Loss

    Instructional supervisors will work with building administrators and specialists to identify assessments that

    diagnose student learning gaps. The results of the diagnostic Assessments will provide teachers with the information needed for taking action to adjust teaching. The assessment data will also play a significant role in improving learning outcomes for all students by assessing what the learner already knows, the nature of difficulties that he/she has, which if undiagnosed might limit their engagement in new learning.

    Baseline and projected student outcomes will be disaggregated by race, service group, and gender.  Interventionists, school specialists, and the literacy coach will compile the data by the individual class roster within each school so that data team meetings can be efficiently conducted.

    The ACPS will use the MTSS framework to provide the following:

     

    • Universal screening for all students in elementary and middle school in the areas of ELA and mathematics early in the school year
    • Increasing levels of targeted support for those who are struggling
    • Integrated plans that address students’ academic, behavioral, social, and emotional needs
    • A school-wide approach to student support, with teachers, counselors, psychologists, and other specialists working as a team to assess students and plan interventions.
    • Professional development so staff can provide interventions and monitor progress effectively
    • Family involvement so parents and guardians understand the interventions and give support at home
    • Frequent monitoring of students’ progress to help decide if more intensive interventions are needed
    • The use of evidence-based strategies at every tier of support

    Specialists and teachers will determine which standards and/or proficiency levels need to be addressed, depending on the content area, based upon where there are deficits in skills, processes, and understanding. For example, in mathematics, the specialists and teachers will examine if the students have deficits in their computational skills and conceptual understanding. The collaborative school-based teams will determine the instructional priorities for each class in order to modify teaching or re-teaching strategies for the students. Using assessments as sources of information, following assessments with corrective instruction, and giving students a second chance are steps in the process that the teachers will use to prescribe appropriate personalized instruction to be responsive to areas where achievement gaps exist in order to prepare a path for instructional success and recovery for each student.

    Assessments will be part of an ongoing effort to help students learn throughout the year. In all cases, teachers, in collaboration with the school interventionists, specialists, and/or literacy coach, will follow assessments with helpful corrective instruction, and then provide students with a second chance to demonstrate their new level of competence and understanding. This second opportunity helps determine the effectiveness of the corrective instruction and offers students another chance to experience success in learning.

    Therefore, the goals of the data collection process will be to inform instructional decisions, to provide evidence of learning, to help build content mastery, and to improve long-term recall for students. Data will be collected throughout the year to assess if students are moving in the right direction toward proficiency in their academic areas. Pre to post-test results may also be used to inform critical areas of need for student learning objectives (SLOs) which are used as part of the teacher evaluation process.

    The district will use the fall 2021 assessment data results, the 2022 spring data when it becomes available, and the 2019 Maryland Report Card data for baseline and trend data as a reference point as it provides data disaggregated by race, service group, and gender for multiple student outcomes. (2019 ACPS Report Card) When making projections on student learning outcomes based on the baseline data, the 2021 fall diagnostics will be used as the starting point.  The 2022 spring MCAP tests will be used as an end-of-the-year checkpoint for the 21-22 school year, as well as for school improvement planning for the 22-23 school year.  The screeners used by the district will be used for the mid-year checkpoints.   The district will analyze achievement and positive and negative outcomes on the assessments. If our students are learning what they are expected to learn, these results will be viewed as positive student outcomes. Low or declining scores will be considered negative student outcomes.   

    Baseline, mid-point, and end of the year data points will also be collected from most of the assessments listed below.

    Elementary ELA

    Pre-K -    Heggerty Phonemic Awareness. Assessment, Letter and Number ID Screener, Math Assessments

    K -           DIBELS/mClass Screener

    KRA

          Gr. 1 -      mClass DIBELS Screener

    Superkids Beginning of Year Assessment

          Gr. 2 -      mClass DIBELS Screener

                    Superkids Beginning of Year Assessment

    Gr. 3 -      mClass DIBELS Screener

                    Amplify CKLA BOY, MOY, and EOY Assessment

    Gr. 4 -     mClass DIBELS Screener

       Amplify CKLA BOY, MOY, and EOY Assessment       

    Gr. 5 -    mClass DIBELS Screener

                  Amplify CKLA BOY, MOY, and EOY Assessment

     

    The ACPS prioritizes using screeners and interventions that have been proven reliable or valid.   A justification or the evidence level for identified interventions used in the elementary ELA programs are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness level of the intervention.

     

    Read Naturally

     

    Read Naturally is a supplemental reading program that aims to improve the reading fluency, accuracy, and comprehension of students.  ACPS uses the web-based version, Read Naturally Live, to support students’ (grades 2-5)  who have mastered the code, or are well on their way to mastering phonemic awareness and phonics.  “The What Works Clearinghouse considers the extent of evidence for Read Naturally on the reading skills of beginning readers to be small for two outcome domains - alphabetic and general reading achievement - and medium to large for two outcome domains-comprehension and reading fluency.”  

     (What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Educational Sciences, updated July 2013)

     

     

    DIBELS 8

     

    ACPS uses DIBELS as the universal screening tool for grades k through 3 and for students in grades 4 and 5 who are determined to be at high risk. 

    DIBELS 8th Edition is a set of short (one minute) fluency measures that can be used for universal screening, benchmark assessment, and progress monitoring.  DIBELS 8th Edition provides standards for gauging the progress of all students. DIBELS 8 has been validated as a screener for dyslexia.

    Research on DIBELS is conducted at the University of Oregon (UO) and began in the late 1980s. Since then, an ongoing series of studies on DIBELS has documented the reliability and validity of the various DIBELS subtests, as well as their sensitivity to student change. Research on DIBELS continues to this day at the UO's Center on Teaching and Learning (CTL) and has been conducted by dozens of UO faculty and students (e.g., Cummings, Park, & Bauer Schaper, 2013; Cummings, Stoolmiller, Baker, Fien, & Kame’enui, 2015; Smolkowski & Cummings, 2016; Stoolmiller, Biancarosa, & Fien, 2013).

     

    Fundations

     

    ACPS uses the Wilson Fundations program as a Tier II intervention for students who have been identified as needing support in phonics and decoding.  Based on the Wilson Reading System Principles, Wilson Fundations provides research-based materials and strategies essential to foundational skill acquisition.  The program provides direct, explicit, systematic, and multi-sensory instruction.  Immediate instructive feedback is given throughout each lesson.  A report from the Florida Center for Reading Research is linked below. 

    https://www.wilsonlanguage.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/FCRR_Fundations_Report.pdf

     

     

    Superkids Reading Program

     

    ACPS uses the Superkids Reading Program to support core instruction in grades kindergarten through two.  Additionally, the Superkids program provides supplemental activities and resources that can be used to support tier 2 needs.  While EdReports.org scores indicate that the program Partially Meets Expectations, those rubrics reflect the Common Core’s emphasis on building knowledge through reading, even in the primary grades. The Superkids program prioritizes and emphasizes the foundational skills of phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension as it also builds students’ content knowledge through reading and writing tasks.  Superkids reflects current scientific reading research and emphasizes the successful instructional experiences that map letters to speech sound and provides ample opportunities to practice skills in the text that align with the sequence of skill instruction.  According to ESSA, Superkids’ studies qualify the program for the Moderate Level of Evidence necessary for funding by ESSA.  For more information on the effectiveness studies and research base, refer to these documents:

     https://cloud.3dissue.net/29994/29888/30151/52842/index.html?66708

    https://www.zaner-bloser.com/reading/superkids-reading-program/pdfs/SK17_Summary_of_Effectiveness_Brochure.pdf   

    Elementary Math

    iReady, the online component of the i-Ready Classroom Mathematics will be used in all grade levels, K through 5.  All students take three diagnostic tests at twelve-week intervals. The first test establishes baseline data and determines individual pathways through differentiated instruction.   

    PreK will be piloting Frog Street math during the 2021-2022 school year.

     

    Elementary Science

    To help close instructional gaps, greater emphasis will be placed on the Science and Engineering Practices. The NGSS Science and Engineering Practices will be grouped into three categories, investigation, evaluation, and developing explanations and solutions to measure growth across all Practices.  Investigation will include the practice of asking questions coupled with designing and conducting investigations.  Evaluation will include the practices of developing and using models, analyzing/interpreting data, and using mathematical and computational thinking.  Developing explanations and solutions will include constructing explanations, arguing from evidence, and obtaining/evaluating/communicating information.

     

    Elementary Social Studies

    All elementary school students will develop the processes and skills of Social Studies (Standard 6.0). Students will be able to differentiate between primary and secondary sources of information, source documents, and contextualize and corroborate evidence to support/refute a statement. The content of the primary source documents will be relevant to that learned at each elementary school grade. 

    To assist in the development of these skills and processes, each quarter, students will be provided with a primary source document.  Teachers will scaffold the process for analyzing and evaluating these documents throughout the school year (total group, small groups, pairs, and then individual).  Document analysis worksheets will be provided to assist students with the process. By working with primary source documents, students will develop knowledge, skills, and analytical abilities.  Students will also be engaged in asking questions, thinking critically, making intelligent inferences, and developing reasoned explanations and interpretations of events and issues in the past and present. These aforementioned skills (Standard 6.0) are incorporated into all units of study, and it is therefore expected that the primary source analysis process will result in raising students’ overall grades. 

    The goal is for all students, as well as targeted subgroups, to show growth from the beginning of the year to the end of the year.  To determine this growth, quarterly grades will be examined at the district level. The expectation is that the overall average quarterly grade for all students and subgroups will increase by at least 3% from the first quarter to the fourth quarter.  In addition to reviewing quarterly grades, teachers will also complete a Google Form/Survey at the end of each quarter.  The form/survey will require the teachers to identify the areas the students struggled with when analyzing the primary sources.  Teachers will also be asked to indicate how they are going to address the areas of weakness going forward.

     

    Gifted and Talented

    A universal screener assessment will be given to all third-grade students in September. Students will participate by taking a subtest in the area of nonverbal reasoning. Nonverbal reasoning requires the student to solve problems by identifying relationships between figures and pictures, providing a sample of students’ abilities to perceive new relations and learn new tasks.

     

    Middle School ELA

    Reading Inventory 

    The Reading Inventory (RI) is a reading assessment program that provides data on students’ reading levels and growth over time. Middle school students begin with the Reading Comprehension Assessment, which measures and monitors students’ growth in reading comprehension. Results indicate students’ reading levels on the Lexile Framework for Reading scale. Lexile measures are used to find a range of reading texts suited to students’ abilities.

    Read 180

    READ 180 is a reading program designed for struggling readers who are reading two or more years below grade level. It provides blended learning instruction, combining digital media with traditional classroom instruction, as well as student assessments. READ 180 includes whole-group instruction, three small-group rotations, and whole-class wrap-up. Students receive small group instruction with a teacher and work with an adaptive computer application that provides an individualized pathway for improving reading deficits. Students also select books on their instructional level for independent reading. Read 180 meets ESSA Strong Evidence Criteria.

    (U.S.Department of Education. (November 2016). “What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report: Read 180.” Institute of Education Sciences. Retrieved 1 October 2021, from https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/InterventionReports/wwc_read180_112916.pdf.  )

    System 44

    System 44 is a foundational reading program that provides intensive reading intervention for older struggling readers, especially students with disabilities. Much like Read 180, the program is designed as a blended learning model, combining digital components with small group instruction and independent reading. Students build mastery of foundational reading skills, close reading and comprehension, as well as academic vocabulary and content-area knowledge. System 44 meets ESSA Strong Evidence Criteria. http://52.1.239.6/products/system-44/experience/program-design.htm.

     

    Moby Max

    ACPS uses Moby Max as a universal remediation, intervention, and enrichment literacy tool for all middle school students. The personalized learning program identifies where a student’s current skills are and then places the student on an individualized pathway that enables the student to experience success while working on skills he or she is ready to learn. Moby Max meets ESSA Strong Evidence Criteria

    https://www.mobymax.com/research.

     

    Middle School Math

    All students take the HMH Math Inventory MI) at the beginning, midpoint, and end of the school year. The beginning MI establishes the baseline data for each student. The MI data is analyzed to determine which students should be placed in the supplementary intervention program for the year, Math 180,  in addition to their grade-level math instruction. All students have additional supplementary programs, Moby Max and School21,  that address deficiencies in student knowledge. These programs provide continuous data, identifying students’ progress in their mathematics knowledge throughout the year.

    Math 180

    ACPS uses the Math 180 program as a Tier II intervention for students who have been identified as needing support in foundational mathematics skills. Math 180® is an engaging and motivating digital math intervention with flexible print for students in middle school who need to build foundational skills to close skills gaps and to successfully transition to Algebra. Math 180 meets ESSA Moderate Evidence Criteria. 

    Math Inventory

    ACPS uses the Math Inventory as a universal screener for all students in Grades 6 through 8. HMH Math Inventory assesses students’ math abilities and performance based on the Quantile® Framework for Mathematics, a scientific taxonomy of more than 500 math concepts and skills that places students’ readiness for math instruction and the difficulty of math tasks on the same scale.

    Moby Max

    ACPS uses Moby Max as a universal remediation, intervention, and enrichment tool for all middle school students. The personalized learning program identifies where a student’s current skills are at and then places the student on an individualized pathway that enables the student to experience success while working on skills they are ready to learn. Moby Max meets ESSA Strong Evidence Criteria

    School21

    ACPS uses School21 as a supplementary digital resource to provide intervention and course level support. This program does not have current ESSA evidence, but is participating in university-led efficacy studies,

     

    Middle School Science

    Each middle school grade 6th, 7th, and 8th will compare course grades in science classes from the 2020-21 SY and the 2022-23 SY. This will be done on a quarterly basis. Each quarter is broken down by modules focused on the Science and Engineering Practices and Cross-cutting concepts. Individual modules that are identified as areas of need will be used as the focus for learning and recovery.  Achievement will be broken down by subgroup when possible. 

     

    Middle School Social Studies

    All middle school students will develop the processes and skills of Social Studies (Standard 6.0). Students will be able to differentiate between primary and secondary sources of information, source documents, and contextualize and corroborate evidence to support/refute a statement. The content used in the mini-DBQs will be relevant to that learned at each middle school grade. 

    To assist in the development of these skills and processes, each quarter students will be provided with a mini-DBQ.  Teachers will scaffold the process for analyzing and evaluating the documents within the DBQs throughout the school year.  Document analysis worksheets, guiding questions, writing templates, and rubrics will be provided to assist students with the DBQ process.  By the 4th quarter, students should be able to complete a mini-DBQ assignment, with a strong thesis statement, with minimal support.

    By working with primary source documents, students will develop knowledge, skills, and analytical abilities.  Students will also be engaged in asking questions, thinking critically, making intelligent inferences, and developing reasoned explanations and interpretations of events and issues in the past and present. These aforementioned skills (Standard 6.0) are incorporated into all units of study, and it is therefore expected that the mini-DBQ process will result in raising students’ overall grades. 

    The goal is for all students, as well as targeted subgroups, to show growth from the beginning of the year to the end of the year.  To determine this growth, quarterly grades will be examined at the district level. The expectation is that the overall average quarterly grade for all students and subgroups will increase by at least 3% from the first quarter to the fourth quarter.  In addition to reviewing quarterly grades, teachers will also complete a Google Form/Survey at the end of each quarter.  The form/survey will require the teachers to identify the areas the students struggled with when writing the mini-DBQs (i.e. analysis, incorporation of evidence, thesis development, etc.).  Teachers will also be asked to indicate how they are going to address the areas of weakness going forward.

     

    High School ELA

    Reading Growth Measure with the Into to Literature series - for Grades and 9 and 10. HMH Reading Growth Measure is an adaptive reading assessment that provides data on students’ reading levels and growth over time. It is designed to be administered three times a year to best gauge both a student's reading level at a point in time and the student’s growth over time. The target for all students, including targeted subgroups,  is to gain 40-50 Lexile points from the baseline RI to the end of year RI, which is the equivalent of a year’s growth. All ELA teachers have a shared responsibility for ensuring that students maintain regular use of the intervention and supplementary programs. The ELA coach is responsible for scheduling and assisting with the administration of the Reading Growth Measure. The ELA coach is also responsible for collecting, analyzing, discussing, and sharing data with school-level and grade-level ELA teams.

     

    The target for all students, including targeted subgroups, is to achieve the equivalent of one reading grade level or more by increasing their Lexiles levels and demonstrating mastery of course standards and prerequisite skills using the diagnostic assessment by the end of the academic year. The classroom teacher is responsible for ensuring that students maintain regular use of the diagnostic program throughout the year. Data can be collected, analyzed, discussed, and shared continually at the classroom, school, and district levels.

     

    High School Math

    High School Mathematics courses do not use a universal screener. Instead, our courses up to Precalculus have existing diagnostic programs, using ALEKS and/or School21 which measure student knowledge at the beginning of the course and allow for student progress to be continually measured throughout the school year for all students. This includes progress on course level standards and growth on prerequisite skills which the diagnostic indicates the student is deficient in. Intervention work, through the diagnostic program, begins immediately once the baseline student knowledge is known.

    ALEKS

    ACPS uses ALEKS for all high school credit math courses through Precalculus. ALEKS measures student knowledge on course and prerequisite content at the beginning of the school year. Based on the student’s Initial Knowledge Check, ALEKS provides a personalized pathway that has students working on skills that they are ready to be successful with. ALEKS does not have an ESSA rating, but has been researched at a level equivalent to ESSA Tier 2 - Moderate Evidence.

     

    School21

     

    ACPS uses School21 as a supplementary digital resource to provide intervention and course level support in Mathematics through Algebra 1. This program does not have current ESSA evidence, but is participating in university-led efficacy studies,

     

    High School Science

    Each ACPS NGSS required high school course (ESS, Bio, Chem) will compare course grades in science classes from the 2021-22 SY and the 2022-23 SY. This will be done on a quarterly basis. Each quarter is broken down by modules focused on the Science and Engineering Practices and Cross-cutting concepts. Individual modules that are identified as areas of need will be used as the focus for learning and recovery.  Achievement will be broken down by subgroup when possible.

     

    High School Social Studies

    All high school students will develop the processes and skills of Social Studies (Standard 6.0). Students will be able to differentiate between primary and secondary sources of information, source documents, and contextualize and corroborate evidence to support/refute a statement. The content used in the mini-DBQs will be relevant to that learned at each high school grade. 

    To assist in the development of these skills and processes, each quarter students will be provided with a mini-DBQ.  Teachers will scaffold the process for analyzing and evaluating the documents within the DBQs throughout the school year.  Document analysis worksheets, guiding questions, writing templates, and rubrics will be provided to assist students with the DBQ process.  By the 4th quarter, students should be able to complete a mini-DBQ assignment, with a strong thesis statement, with minimal support.

    By working with primary source documents, students will develop knowledge, skills, and analytical abilities.  Students will also be engaged in asking questions, thinking critically, making intelligent inferences, and developing reasoned explanations and interpretations of events and issues in the past and present. These aforementioned skills (Standard 6.0) are incorporated into all units of study, and it is therefore expected that the mini-DBQ process will result in raising students’ overall grades. 

    The goal is for all students, as well as targeted subgroups, to show growth from the beginning of the year to the end of the year.  To determine this growth, quarterly grades will be examined at the district level. The expectation is that the overall average quarterly grade for all students and subgroups will increase by at least 3% from the first quarter to the fourth quarter.  In addition to reviewing quarterly grades, teachers will also complete a Google Form/Survey at the end of each quarter.  The form/survey will require the teachers to identify the areas the students struggled with when writing the mini-DBQs (i.e. analysis, incorporation of evidence, thesis development, etc.).  Teachers will also be asked to indicate how they are going to address the areas of weakness going forward.

     

    Social/Emotional Learning (SEL)

    The Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS) will be completed for every student grades K-12 three times in the year. Pupil Service/Support Teams (PST) at each school utilize SRSS data as well as other data (Request for Assistance Forms; Mental Health Referrals, ODRs, Attendance Reports, Grade Reports) to identify, implement, and monitor tier II/III interventions. Tier I SEL is implemented by school counselors at all levels. Behavior Specialists, School Psychologists, and SEL Coaches provide tier II/III interventions.

     

    Implementation Plan

     

    The purpose of the implementation plan is to ensure interventions used in the ACPS are being implemented as intended and progressing as determined by the key stakeholders. Professional learning experiences will be integrated throughout the implementation process to build the capacity of staff.  The ACPS prioritizes the use of data and focuses on students who face obstacles in engagement in the learning process. A timeline is listed below.  Data results are included in the Appendix. Evidence-based instructional strategies, research-based interventions, and tutoring/remediation opportunities are provided to students who need additional support. 

     

     

     

     

    Elementary Reading Screening/Intervention Timeline

     

    Date

    Process to be completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    9/6 - 9/20

    Screener Administration

    K-5 mClass DIBELS 8

    4-5 Reading Inventory as requested

    Secondary screeners administered as needed to narrow down skill deficits

    mClass digital access

    touch screen device

    RI Access

     

    PAST screener, QPS

    mClass implementation with trainers

    Follow-up support by literacy coaches

    9/21 - 9/29

    Initial Collaborative Data Meetings (literacy coach, intervention teacher, classroom teachers, principal) Determine intervention and plan for Progress Monitoring

    K-3 mClass Reports

    4-5 RI Reports

    Intervention Cycle Meeting Notes pages

    ACPS Tiered Literacy Program options

    MTSS Training with principals / coaches /  interventionists

    9/20-10/1

    Identified Intervention / Supplemental Instruction begins with scheduled progress monitoring

     

    Tiered literacy materials, resources and programs

    Literacy Coaches provide support to classroom teachers for any needed program /resource training

    11/30 - 12/9

    Intervention Cycle Meetings - Data analysis to determine effectiveness of student intervention plans. Changes made as needed.

    (literacy coach, intervention teacher, classroom teachers, principal)

    Intervention Cycle Meeting Notes Pages

    mClass Reports

    Progress Monitoring Data

    Classroom / core program  data

    Using core program materials to differentiate and extend the supplemental instruction plan

    1/9-1/24

    Screener Administration -2

    K-3 mClass DIBELS8

    4-5 DIBELS as needed/ RI

    Secondary screeners administered as needed to narrow down skill deficits

     

    mClass digital access

    touch screen device

    RI Access

     

    PAST, QPS screener

    mClass Suggested intervention lessons

    1/25 - 2/3

    Collaborative Data Meetings

    Plan for Progress Monitoring

    Intervention Cycle Meeting Notes Pages

    mClass Reports

    RI Reports

    Progress Monitoring Data

    Classroom / core program data

    Literacy Coaches provide support to classroom teachers for any needed program/resource training

    2/6 (or before)

    Continuation of Intervention / Supplemental Instruction plan

    OR

    New plan developed and implemented based on data meetings

    Tiered literacy materials, resources and programs

    Literacy Coaches provide support to classroom teachers for any needed program/resource training

    3/27 - 4/4

    Intervention Cycle Meetings - Data analysis to determine effectiveness of student intervention plans. Changes made as needed.

    (literacy coach, intervention teacher, classroom teachers, principal)

    Intervention Cycle Meeting Notes Pages

    mClass Reports

    RI Reports

    Progress Monitoring Data

    Classroom / core program data

    Literacy Coaches provide support to classroom teachers for any needed program/resource training

    5/8 - 5/19

    Screener Administration -3

    K-3 mClass DIBELS 8

    4,5 DIBELS as needed

    4-5 Reading Inventory

     

     

    mClass digital access

    touch screen device

    RI Access

     

    PAST, QPS screener

    Evaluating effectiveness of supplemental instruction / interventions

    5/22 - 5/31

    Collaborative Data Meetings

    Individual student progress documented

    School wide data compiled

    Intervention Cycle Meeting Notes Pages

    mClass Reports

    RI Reports

    Progress Monitoring Data

    Classroom / core program data

    Create plans for identified areas of need for literacy PD in summer / early fall.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Elementary Mathematics Screening/Intervention Timeline

    Date

    Process to be Completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    September

    -The implementation of iReady  will begin as soon as the first diagnostic assessment is completed and individual pathways are established.

    -computer access

    - iready program

    -PD provided by Curriculum Associates on the utilization of the program

    -weekly grade level team meetings to include adjusting individual pathways

    January

    -Second iReady diagnostic assessment

    --Mid-year diagnostic test will evaluate progress in achieving the identified goal.

    -computer access

    - iready program

    -weekly grade level team meetings to include adjusting individual pathways

    -PD provided by Curriculum Associates

    May

    -Third iReady diagnostic assessment

    -All students are to exceed their individual growth targets as identified  by iReady  for a typical year.

    -computer access

    - iready program

    -weekly grade level team meetings to include adjusting individual pathways

     

     

    Middle School Mathematics and ELA Screening / Intervention Timeline

    Date

    Process to be Completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    September

    -Math (MI) and Reading (RI) Inventory

    -Identify students for Math 180 and Read 180/System 44 programs

    -MI and RI digital access

    -Set up student Math 180 and Read 180/System 44 access

    -Data Analysis by Math and ELA Specialists

    -Department level meetings to discuss MI, RI data and intervention placements

    -Bi-annual HMH Data meetings

    February

    -Math (MI) and Reading  (RI) Inventory

    -Re-evaluate student placements in Math 180 and Read 180/System 44

    -MI and RI digital access

    -Data Analysis by Math and ELA Specialists

    -Department level meetings to discuss MI, RI data and intervention placements

    May

    -Math (MI) and Reading (RI) Inventory

    -Evaluate student progress for future placement in Math 180, Read 180, or subsequent intervention program

    -MI and RI digital access

    -Data Analysis by Math and ELA Specialists

    -Department level meetings to discuss MI, RI data and intervention placements

    -Bi-annual HMH data meetings

     

    High School ELA Screening

    Date

    Process to be Completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    September

    Reading Growth Measure is administered to all students in English 9 and 10 to establish baseline data.

    -Reading Growth Measure digital access

    -Chromebooks

    -Data Analysis by ELA Coach and classroom teachers

    -Department level meetings to discuss data and potential intervention placements

    February

    -Reading Growth Measure is administered to all students in English 9 and 10 for midpoint data.

    -Reading Growth Measure digital access

    -Chromebooks

    -Data Analysis by ELA Coach and classroom teachers

    -Department level meetings to discuss data and potential intervention placements.

    May

    -Reading Growth Measure is administered to all students in English 9 and 10 for EOY data.

    -Evaluate student progress for future placement in subsequent intervention program

    -Reading Growth Measure digital access

    -Chromebooks

    -Data Analysis by ELA Coach and classroom teachers

    -Department level meetings to discuss data and potential intervention placements

     

    High School Math Screening (through Pre-Calculus)

    Date

    Process to be Completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    September

    -Students complete their Initial Knowledge Check (IKC) in ALEKS

    -Computer access

    - Active 12-month license in ALEKS

    -Data Analysis by classroom teacher

    - Aggregate data compiled at district level

    February

    -Students complete a mid-year progress check in ALEKS

    -Computer access

    - Active 12-month license in ALEKS

    -Data Analysis by classroom teacher

    - Aggregate data compiled at district level

    May

    -Students complete an end-of-year progress check in ALEKS

    -Computer access

    - Active 12-month license in ALEKS

    -Data Analysis by classroom teacher

    - Aggregate data compiled at district level

     

    3-12 Social Studies (*Elementary Only)

    Dates

    Process to be Completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    1st Quarter (by 10/28)

    2nd Quarter (by 1/14)

    3rd Quarter (by 3/25)

    4th Quarter (by 6/3)

     

     

     

     

    3-5:  Each quarter, students will be provided with a primary source document.  Teachers will scaffold the process for analyzing and evaluating these documents throughout the school year (total group, small groups, pairs, and then individual).  Document analysis worksheets will be provided to assist students with the process.

     

    At the end of each quarter, teachers will complete a Google Form/Survey which will ask them to identify the areas the students struggled with when analyzing the primary source documents. Teachers will also be asked to indicate how they are going to address the areas of weakness going forward. In addition, quarterly grades will be reviewed at the district level.  Since the primary source document analysis  strengthens the skills and process of Standard 6.0, a standard that is incorporated into all units of study, it is the expectation that the overall average for the 4th quarter grade will increase a minimum of 3% from the overall average of the 1st quarter grade.  Average quarterly grades of targeted subgroups will also be reviewed.

     

     

    6-11: Each quarter, students will be provided with a mini-DBQ.  Teachers will scaffold the process for analyzing and evaluating the documents within the DBQs throughout the school year.  Document analysis worksheets, guiding questions, writing templates, and rubrics will be provided to assist students with the DBQ process. 

     

    At the end of each quarter, teachers will complete a Google Form/Survey which will ask them to identify the areas the students struggled with when writing the mini-DBQs (i.e. analysis, incorporation of evidence, thesis development, etc. ).  Teachers will also be asked to indicate how they are going to address the areas of weakness going forward. In addition, quarterly grades will be reviewed at the district level.  Since the mini DBQ process strengthens the skills and process of Standard 6.0, a standard that is incorporated into all units of study, it is the expectation that overall average for the 4th quarter grade will increase a minimum of 3% from the overall average of the 1st quarter grade.  Average quarterly grades of targeted subgroups will also be reviewed.

     

    *King, B. (2022). Maryland: An American adventure 1450-1790. Gibbs Smith Education.

    *King, B. (2022). Maryland: An American adventure 1780-Present. Gibbs Smith Education.

    *National Archives and Records Administration. (n.d.). Document analysis worksheets. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved October 1, 2021, from https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets.

    DBQ Online. DBQ. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2021, from https://www.dbqonline.com/instructor/.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • Teachers will review the online PD videos provided by DBQ Online.
    • Department leaders/chairs and grade level/faculty meetings will take place at the end of each quarter.  During meetings teachers will review and analyze grades and discussions surrounding student performance will take place. 
    • A Google Form/Survey will be distributed to teachers at the end of each quarter.  Teachers will identify areas that students are struggling with when writing mini-DBQs (grades 6-11) and analyzing primary sources (grades 3-5).
      • Next steps will be recommended.
    • All teachers will meet on January 18, 2022 for Supervisor PD.  During this meeting additional conservations surrounding students’ performance will be discussed.

    6-High Science

    Dates

    Process to be Completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    1st Quarter (by 10/28)

    2nd Quarter (by 1/14)

    3rd Quarter (by 3/25)

    4th Quarter (by 6/3)

     

     

     

     

    6-11: Each quarter, students will be provided with assignments focused on the Cross-cutting Concepts and Science and Engineering Practices.

     

    At the end of each quarter, teachers will share the results of their student grades on assignments with their selected department chair/department leader.   The department chairs/leaders will meet to analyze and discuss the data in order to determine levels of growth and possible next steps. School-based team meetings will also be used to disaggregate and interpret the data.

    • Discovery Education Techbooks
    • Edcite Testing platform
    • NearPod
    • EdPuzzle
    • ALBERT
    • Labster
    • Pivot
    • Explore Learning Gizmos
    • NewsELA
    • TPT School Access

     

     

     

    • Department leaders/chairs and grade level faculty meetings will take place at the end of each quarter.  During these meetings, teachers will review and analyze data.
      • Next steps will be recommended.
    • All teachers will meet in January for Supervisor PD.  During this meeting, additional conservations surrounding students’ performance on the SEPs and CCCs.

     

    SEL Screening/Intervention Timeline

    Date

    Process to be completed

    Tools / Materials Necessary

    Professional Learning

    Fall

    Ripple Effects Tier II/III intervention roll out to secondary behavior specialists and SEL Coach.

    Ripple Effects software

    Ripple Effects trainers trained secondary behavior specialists and SELcoach.

    Fall

    Rollout of Tier I Toolbox intervention for K-5.

    Toolbox kits; curriculum; puppets; administrator guides; posters for classrooms and schools

    Training done by the behavior specialists and counselors from the five pilot schools; counselors from each school trained faculty.

    August/Sept.

    PST Chair Training.

    Google sheet logs; Intervention decision tool; MTSS chart; Request for Assistance Form

    Training facilitated by Equity Coordinator, Mental Health Coordinator, Supervisor and Assistant Supervisor of Special Ed., and Assistant Supervisor of Discipline

    October

    All schools administer Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS) Internal/External behaviors to help identify students in need of MTSS interventions.

     

    Aspen

     

    PST chair training.

    Step-by-step instructions sent as follow-up.

    Follow-up support by Assistant Supervisor of Special Ed.

    Fall of 22

    Trauma lens/ACES training for all staff.

    Mental Health Specialist-created training video and discussion

    Mental Health Specialist (MHS) trains school counselors.

    School counselors train staff.

    MHS follow-up with support through PST.

    Ongoing Weekly

    Weekly collaborative data meetings (administrator, school counselor, mental health specialist, nurse, psychologist, PPW, Project YES, and SEL coach). Plan for progress monitoring.

    Tiered intervention chart, intervention decision tool, PST log; PBIS data, attendance data, ODRs, Request for Assistance Form

    Chair training; follow-up support from behavior specialists, assistant supervisors, and equity coordinator.

    January

    All schools administer SRSS Internal/External behaviors to help identify students in need of MTSS interventions and monitor progress of implemented interventions.

     

    Aspen

    MTSS intervention training support from behavior specialists and MHS.

    May  (four weeks before the end of the school year)

    All schools administer SRSS Internal/External behaviors to help monitor progress of MTSS interventions.

    School wide data compiled.

    Aspen

    Create plans for identified areas of need for trauma informed lens, restorative practices, and/or disrupting implicit bias in summer/early fall.

     

    Academics, Equity, and Accountability

     

    Educational Equity https://www.acpsmd.org/cms/lib/MD01907365/Centricity/domain/36/policy%20document/IMAA%20-%20Educational%20Equity%20Policy%20042319.pdf

    The ACPS is committed to the success of each student in our schools. Our district prioritizes educational equity by recognizing and removing institutional barriers and ensuring that social identifiers are not obstacles to accessing educational opportunities and supports that benefit each student as ensured in our Board of Education Equity Policy. The COVID-19 pandemic affected our most vulnerable populations in the ACPS. Therefore, the ACPS will ensure that every policy, procedure and practice will be evaluated through an equity lens as we appropriately plan and prepare for the reopening of schools.   Achieving equity means implicit biases and students’ identities will neither predict nor predetermine their success in school. Educational equity is a lens through which all policies, procedures, and practices are viewed and decided. Definitions Educational Equity means providing access to essential academic, social, emotional, and economic resources, supports, and opportunities; in order to engage each student, throughout their educational career.

    Educational Equity also maximizes academic success for each student through rigorous instruction, with appropriate educational resources, to achieve their highest potential, their social/emotional well- being, and to ensure that their social identifiers are valued as an asset. Social Identifiers mean demographic factors identified as, but not limited to, age, color, ability (cognitive, social/emotional, and physical), ethnicity, family structure, gender identity and expression, language, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, and socio-economics.

    Accountability measures mean those Maryland accountability framework indicators in place to guarantee oversight of opportunities, resources, and educational rigor that will lead to achievement for each student. Educational opportunities mean each student has access to rigorous well-rounded academic programs and experiences that enrich their educational career. Equity lens means that for any program, practice, decision, or action, the impact on each student is addressed, with strategic focus on marginalized student groups.

    In support of the goals of this Educational Equity policy, the Board establishes an Equity Advisory Committee to work with the superintendent to assist in the development of the action plan to implement this policy and advise the superintendent on educational equity issues within the school system. The Equity Advisory Committee also shall assist the superintendent in developing strategies to ensure that equitable educational opportunities are being provided to all of the students who attend our schools. Allegany County Public Schools is committed to providing clear expectations that prioritizes educational equity (COMAR 13A.01.06) in providing every student with equitable access to the educational rigor, resources, and support that are designed to maximize the student’s academic success and social/emotional well-being and that will be used to engage our students, families, and staff in all settings, including a traditional learning environment, a hybrid setting and/or when virtual programming is required.

    The ACPS will be prepared to implement a virtual, hybrid, and traditional learning schedule if/when a COVID spike warrant such a decision.  At the highest level, and determined by guidance from the CDC, MDH, and local ACHD, the ACPS will be prepared to move to Stage 1 where fully virtual instructional programming is required. In Stage 2, each local school system must meet the Requirements for Opening Schools as outlined in the Maryland Together: Maryland’s Recovery Plan for Education.

    • Develop and submit local education plans with a plan for communication
    • Incorporate equity as a component in the local recovery plan
    • Establish local education recovery stakeholder groups
    • Identify learning gaps and instructional placement of students
    • Follow and maintain curricular frameworks and MD College and Career Ready Standards
    • Adhere to components of IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and ADA
    • Ensure safe transportation for all students
    • Develop a system for tracking attendance

    During Stage 3, the local school system makes determinations regarding which groups of students and staff will be able to re-enter buildings. Specific schedules, calendar modifications, and delivery of instruction are at the discretion of the local school system. Depending on conditions in their locality, school systems may be more restrictive than the requirements outlined in the State Recovery Plan, and the health and safety measures outlined by the Governor and Maryland Department of Health.

    In Stage 1: All school activities are to be conducted online and through distance learning platforms.

    In Stage 2: Some in-person school activities may commence, in accordance with the Governor’s gating and social distancing measure

    In Stage 3: In-person activities may fully resume, and schools can begin normal/traditional operations consistent with additional safety measures.

    Instructional programming during any stage will be based on consistent practices and expectations across all grade levels in the ACPS. Teachers, support staff, and building administrators will implement consistent procedural practices for regular, hybrid, and virtual instruction.  Each teacher will provide procedures and practices to ensure that there are no obstacles to accessing instruction, regardless of the method of instruction.

    Teachers will provide expectations to their students on synchronous1 and asynchronous2 instruction and instructional assignments, as well as expectations on grading, assessment, and learning expectations that are aligned to the ACPS BOE policy.

    1Synchronous Instruction: A group of students is engaging in learning at the same time. The teacher and the student are engaged in video teleconferencing or live streaming.

    2Asynchronous Instruction: Students learn the same material at different times and locations. Teachers will be assigning work to be completed by students. These assignments and tasks often will be completed by the student independently and in response to objectives within individual lessons.

    If directed by the Superintendent and approved by the Board of Education, the ACPS students will receive a combination of virtual and at-school instruction, which we will refer to as a hybrid instructional model if in Stage 2. However, the Superintendent with approval by the Board of Education may choose, necessary, to provide a fully virtual or distance learning model where students will attend and participate in a virtual synchronous environment, video-conferencing with their teachers and the completion of assigned work in an asynchronous environment where students are working independently online.

     

    Instructional Expectations

    The ACPS will ensure that Maryland College and Career Ready Standards, PreK-12, are taught in all content areas and the State Frameworks, which include career and technical education (CTE),  are followed for each content.

     

     

    CCR Standards

    Accountability

    MSDE Website

    Links

    ACPS will ensure that the College and Career-Ready Standards in PreK through Grade 12 are taught in all the content areas and the state frameworks are followed for each content.

     

    These standards define what students should know and be able to do at each grade level and align state standards and state assessments.

    The ACPS

    benchmarks that are aligned to the standards will be used to aid in the accountability of teaching to the standards.

     

    Schools will continue to use root cause analysis techniques to determine goals and strategies for school improvement purposes.

    Instruction, Frameworks, and Units of Study

     

    https://marylandpublicschools.org/about/Pages/DCIPL/index.aspx

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ------------------------

    Other Areas

     

    Technology Education

     

    CTE

    https://marylandpublicschools.org/about/Pages/DCAA/Math/index.aspx

     

    https://marylandpublicschools.org/programs/Pages/ELA/index.aspx

     

     

    https://marylandpublicschools.org/about/Pages/DCAA/Social-Studies/index.aspx

     

    https://marylandpublicschools.org/about/Pages/DCAA/Science/index.aspx

     

     

     

    http://www.dsd.state.md.us/comar/comarhtml/13a/13a.04.01.01.htm

     

    https://www.mdctedata.org/state/index.php

    http://staging.barnowlbox.com/programs.php#

     

    CTE Dashboard at this link.

     

    Ensuring Communication, Professional Learning, and Resources which Promote Integration of the PreK-12 State Frameworks

     

    ACPS has invested in high-quality resources that have been evaluated through the EdReports vetting process or through other independent agencies. In conjunction with those purchases, ACPS has been rewriting and refining our curriculums for upcoming state vetting. During this refinement process, ACPS is making tight connections between the state frameworks and these high-quality materials.

     

    Professional learning is currently being provided by our resource vendors and is supplemented by ACPS teacher-led professional learning which is built into the teacher’s work schedule within the Recovery Plan. Furthermore, ACPS has embedded collaborative planning time into the teacher work schedules which enables teams of same course teachers to work collaboratively to develop lessons, activities, assessments, and supplemental resources which support our vetted curricular resources and adhere to the state PreK-12 state frameworks. In addition, staff development sessions are provided throughout the year for both principal and supervisors to ensure continuous communication and professional learning for the use, integration, and accountability of the PreK-12 state frameworks. Teachers are encouraged to contact their content supervisors for assistance, as needed, with ensuring that the standards and frameworks are followed for each content, as well as to ensure that equity for all students is reflected in the instructional expectations.

     

    The Maryland College and Career Ready Standards (MCCRS) will be used to ensure that students have a strong command of the skills and processes taught in all of the content areas. In order to deliver a quality educational experience for every student, the district has set the expectations that Pre-K through 12 MCCRS must be taught in all content areas. While there is a strong focus on ensuring that the standards and frameworks are followed for mathematics, English language arts, social studies, and science, the district is also committed to maintaining the inclusion of fine arts, physical education, health education, technology education, family consumer sciences, social and emotional learning, mental health, and environmental literacy as part of the instructional program. Regardless of a fully virtual, hybrid, or traditional schedule, students will be enrolled in all of their classes, including the aforementioned ones, as well as other electives, as applicable.

     

    The CTE programs in the ACPS will be aligned to industry standards and will be developed and organized in the following manner: CTE programs are developed in conjunction with all relevant stakeholder groups. CTE programs are organized under broad clusters, based on all aspects of an industry, designed to help students make informed decisions regarding career pathways. Economic market demands, both current and projected, constitute the criteria for identifying value-added opportunities. CTE programs are developed in response to an identified opportunity to add value to students’ overall educational programs by preparing them for both college and careers. CTE programs are based on the most appropriate, reliable, and valid technical and academic standards available. CTE programs provide multiple options for students as they prepare for entry into careers and further education. CTE programs are measured against student attainment of rigorous academic, employability, and technical skills and student success in further education and employment. Local school systems and local advisory councils collect and analyze data on student attainment of rigorous academic, employability, and technical skills.

    Maryland Technology Education Standards are organized into five interdependent conceptual understanding categories. 1. The Nature of Technology 2. Impacts of Technology 3. Engineering Design and Development 4. Core Technologies and the Designed World 5. Computational Thinking and Computer Science Applications Each category represents an overarching concept that fosters technological literacy. Concepts are deconstructed into essential skills and knowledge that details what students must know and do to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of each category. Essential skills and knowledge are organized by grade bands representing middle school (Grades 6-8), high school (grades 9-12), and advanced technology (Grades 10-12) expectations. Technology education standards are designed to be used in conjunction with Maryland State Curriculum Frameworks for Reading and Writing in Science and Technical Subjects. Ultimately, students should be able to participate in rigorous technology education courses that will allow them to acquire the skills and knowledge expected of technologically literate individuals.

     

    Grades 6 – 8 Local school systems can offer students course options that will allow them to meet expectations detailed in the Maryland Technology Education Standards document. Local school system leaders can develop or adopt their own course offerings or use MSDE pre-approved courses.

     

    Grades 9-12 Technology education is a graduation requirement for all Maryland public school students (COMAR 13A.04.01.01). Each local school system is required to offer a technology education program in grades 9-12 that will allow students to meet graduation requirements and select advanced technology education electives.

     

    Per COMAR 13.A.04.11, World Languages must be offered to begin in middle school. Students enrolled in the world language program will continue when schools reopen in the fall. In Grades 6-7, students are enrolled in World Languages and Cultures of the World. In Grade 8, students may enroll in Spanish I. The district also has a Chinese Immersion Program (CHIP) in Grades K-8. A cohort model is used for the CHIP program. Currently, students in the CHIP program at the middle school level are taking courses to potentially earn high school credits in Chinese I, II, and III.

     

    COMAR 13.A.04.17.01 requires that Environmental Literacy is integrated into current curricular offerings. While some aspects of environmental literacy can occur in a digital and online environment, it is the intent of the district that outdoor field experiences are completed face-to-face with teachers leading instruction with small groups of students as soon as it is safe and feasible to implement the hybrid plan for in-school learning. Developmentally appropriate lessons and activities have been created to ensure that elements of the Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) are completed in accordance with the county’s curriculum/scope and sequence during the year.

     

    Regardless of the instructional model (Distance Learning, Hybrid, or Traditional), the ACPS teachers will utilize components of the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) to provide focused instruction, guided practice, and independent learning in all grades and content areas. While collaborative learning may be more challenging via distance learning, teachers will utilize Schoology tools to provide collaborative opportunities when the district is utilizing a fully virtual learning environment. Teachers have been trained on how to differentiate instruction and provide break-out sessions for the students.

     

    Achievement & Growth

    ACPS will ensure that every student has equitable access to the educational rigor, resources, and support that are designed to maximize a student’s academic success and social/emotional well-being. The instructional expectations, procedures, and practices will provide for educational equity while ensuring that obstacles are proactively addressed and resolved. Achievement gaps will be identified and strategies will be implemented to address the gaps.  Results from the summer recovery programs will be used to identify and address learning needs.  The ACPS will continue to be prepared for Stage 1 and Stage 2 by ensuring the following occur:

    • Continued county-wide partnerships to support connectivity issues and concerns.
    • Provide technology devices as needed to ACPS students.
    • Provide individual and community hotspots for learning for students with connectivity concerns.
    • Work with the County Government for infrastructure support.
    • Provide time and support to teach students and parents how to access and utilize the LMS.
    • Provide online tutorials and other resources for parents and students.
    • Provide local and diagnostic assessments to identify gaps in learning and prepare a path for success and recovery.
    • Ensure appropriate support is given to our most vulnerable populations through collaboration and coordination with School Counselors, PPWs, Resource Teachers, School Psychologists, Interventionists, and Case Managers.
    • Provide professional learning opportunities which will focus on ensuring equitable access to a well-rounded curriculum for our historically underserved students.
    • Provide virtual Parent Conferences, if needed, to help support families with challenging instructional and/or personal support needs.

     

    School Climate & Culture

    ACPS will ensure that students have equitable access to the educational rigor, resources, and support that are designed to maximize a student’s academic success and social/emotional well-being. The instructional expectations, procedures, and practices will provide for educational equity while ensuring that obstacles are proactively addressed and resolved. Achievement gaps will be identified and strategies will be implemented to address the gaps.

    ACPS will ensure that distance learning/remote learning climates support student success and that such learning environments are welcoming, affirming, and positive. The ACPS will continue to identify any areas of disproportionality and identify root causes and strategies to eliminate any disparities. The ACPS will continue to ensure that counseling and mental health services are provided to meet social, emotional, and mental health needs.

     

    • Each school counselor and/or mental health provider will provide ways for students to discuss and express concerns and feelings.
    • Schools will implement wellness checks with a focus on students and families who are disengaged or families who do not respond to school communications.
    • Provide ways for students to engage in student voice groups in the effort to help create awareness of racism and in the effort to help educate the community to combat this ill in society. The group includes current high school students, recent graduates, educators, and community members. The students will record panel discussions about their experiences with race in schools to serve as professional learning, create awareness, and serve in an advisory capacity to administration as we continue to work to dismantle systemic racism.
    • Provide professional learning opportunities for teachers that will support and promote classrooms where students can share personal experiences by continuing in the second leg of the county-wide restorative practices roll out and training school staff on available resources such as Project Wisdom.

     

    Student Support Services and Mental Health

    School Counselors:

      • Coordinate with the administrative team and mental health colleagues to address the unique needs and challenges of their school relating to the support needed for students and staff.
      • Meet in-person or virtually with individual students and families as needed.
      • Assist with scheduling changes for individual students or groups of students based on the instructional delivery model being implemented within the district.
      • Intervene with students in need of individualized support.
      • Teach and/or coordinate small group and classroom lessons focused on the social-emotional needs of students.
      • Participate in PST, IEP, 504, and other meetings as assigned by the principal or supervisor.
      • The high school counselors plan to work together toward creating CCR materials and presentations that can be delivered utilizing the LMS and Schoology.
      • High school counselors will also be sharing resources through the LMS to assist students with meeting graduation requirements, completing college applications, providing scholarship information, and more.
      • School counselors will continue to serve as a liaison in the referral process for students who would benefit from support from our Tier III behavioral specialists.

     

    School Psychologists:

      • Assist with the coordination of school-wide SEL initiatives in order to support the social-emotional needs of students.
      • Identify students with existing behavior plans, provide training and support to classroom teachers to accomplish successful implementation, and update the plan as needed.
      • Special Education Support:
        • Monitor identified students for potential need of increased support;
        • Provide student counseling services and parent coaching as needed;
        • Complete assessments; and
        • Participate in IEP meetings.

     

    Pupil Personnel Workers (PPW’s):

      • Serve as a liaison between the family and school to ensure students have access to instruction.
      • Identify challenges families are experiencing that are barriers to learning and work with principals and other ACPS staff to provide direct services in an effort to mitigate the impact on learning.
        • Conduct home visits
        • Deliver food, clothing, school supplies, etc.

     

    Mental Health Personnel:

      • Provides direct services (individual/group therapeutic services, social and emotional learning)
      • Provides after-care services
      • Counseling home & hospital students
      • Serves as liaison for home-school-community
      • Counseling home & hospital students

    Interscholastic Athletics

    The MPSSAA has been committed to providing local school systems (LSS) guidance for the return to interscholastic athletic programs. ACPS will be competing within the defined seasonal opportunities of the MPSSAA and will implement any necessary mitigation strategies to ensure the continuity of participation.  The MPSSAA has also provided a general section guide to making decisions on the extent of participation within local and state health department information.

     

    ACPS shall utilize the PreK-12 and Child Care Guidance (7.22.22) documentation and local health department guidance to determine the extent of participation in our district. Decisions shall be in full compliance with state and local health orders and regulations.

     

    ACPS will begin fall sports engagement on August 10, 2022. All student athletes are required to provide up to date medical forms, which includes at COVID-19 acknowledgment form prior to the start of the first practice date. ACPS athletic teams have full fall schedules. ACPS has and will continue to utilize the COMAR 13A.06.03.06B (1) - waiver of the requirement that all sports schedules must be set by the first allowable play date. This waiver has provided flexibility to ACPS to reschedule and adapt to the latest response to COVID-19 per locale, which has been necessary.

     

    Special Education

    ACPS is committed to ensuring compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (Section 504), and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). All students with IEPs will continue to receive FAPE as outlined on their IEP regardless of the model of instruction. 

    Compliance is ensured by monthly fidelity checks that are completed between IEP chairpersons and every special education teacher during scheduled coaching sessions.  An emphasis of the coaching sessions is the instructional cycle including development of the IEP, delivery of service, collection and analysis of data, and revision to instructional delivery. Special education department supervisors hold monthly coaching sessions with IEP chairpersons.  During these sessions, regular self-auditing of IEPs occurs, as well as a review of the information gained during the teacher/IEP chairperson coaching sessions. The special education department tracks referrals and evaluations to ensure compliance with timelines using a central tracking system.  All special education and related service providers are completing daily service logs which are uploaded and available for review to document the provision of special education services.

    Beginning October 1, 2021, in compliance with Maryland SB300/HB714, each IEP developed or revised will contain a Learning Continuity Plan to be implemented during emergency conditions.  Each team will determine, in the event of emergency conditions, if the IEP can be implemented as written, revised either through an amendment with parent consent, or a scheduled IEP team meeting. A reasonable attempt will be made to contact the parent within 10 days of the determination of the emergency condition, notifying them of the implementation of the learning continuity plan and seeking input on how to best implement the IEP during emergency conditions.

     

    Accessibility:

    ACPS has developed a team to review digitally based and online instructional resources to be sure they comply with current Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.  ACPS has provided guidance and tutorials on creating instructional documents and materials that are fundamentally compliant with Web Content Access Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 Level AA. These guidelines were reviewed with content supervisors and provided to school-based administrators to review with their instructional staff. ACPS strives to make all instructional materials and technology-based resources whether purchased or teacher produced accessible to all users. ACPS has established a point of contact at accessibility@acpsmd.org for those individuals requesting materials or information in additional alternate formats.

        ACPS will:

    • Follow provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) related to special education to provide a Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) for students with disabilities.
    • Follow guidance in the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) Technical Assistance Bulletins (TABs) related to COVID-19.
    • Consider whether or not a student has experienced a regression of skills and/or lack of progress.
    • If regression and/or lack of progress is present, identify opportunities for recovery, including additional, new, or different services and accommodations, as well as the need for compensatory services.
    • Special education and related services will be implemented as identified in the Individualized Education Program (IEP).

    Roles and Responsibilities of Special Educators and Related Service Providers:

    • Work with families of students Birth-21 to collaboratively develop, implement, and evaluate IEPs;
    • Communicate with families, administrators, and general educators;
    • Partner with general educators to support learning for students with disabilities, regardless of the method of instruction;
    • Collaborate with general educators to ensure that each student on their caseload is accessing the general education setting to the greatest extent possible as identified by the IEP;
    • Work with general educators to co-develop, co-implement, and co-evaluate specially designed instruction as identified in the IEP for each student;
    • Ensure assigned general education teachers have updated accommodations and support them as needed;
    • Recommend to parents and teachers additional online learning tools, strategies, or activities that students might be able to access to support the maintenance of skills related to needs;
    • Respond to parent questions and communicate progress;
    • Monitor and document progress towards IEP goals as appropriate;
    • Implement related services as identified in the IEP;
    • Conduct IEP team meetings as appropriate;
    • Complete assessments identified by the IEP team as appropriate and consistent with the health and safety needs of the student and staff member(s);
    • Engage in ongoing professional learning; and
    • Advocate for students with disabilities to ensure equitable access to learning.

     

         Students with Complex Medical Needs/Underlying Health Conditions:

     

    ACPS will take into account the current health and safety conditions, as well as the health requirements of the individual student when planning services for students with complex medical needs and underlying health conditions.

    If a child with a disability at high risk of severe medical complications is excluded from school during an outbreak of COVID-19 the provision of services such as online or virtual instruction, instructional telephone calls, and other curriculum-based instructional activities will occur to the extent appropriate for each individual child.

    For those children who have difficulty or are unable to wear a mask due to their disability. The IEP team will intentionally design and implement a plan for guided or direct instruction, modeling, and practice for the student to wear a mask. The team will utilize strategies known to be effective with the student, which the family can support, including the design of a simple data collection chart considering the daily schedule, behaviors, and minimum length of mask-wearing time necessary for the student’s safe participation in direct in-person instruction.

     

    Attendance

     

    Overview: During traditional learning, the school system will track student attendance through the Aspen Management System.  At the elementary level, daily attendance is completed for students each day.  At the middle and high school levels, class attendance is taken for each period.  Official DAILY attendance is recorded in the Aspen System.

    In addition, the Maryland State Department of Education requires that all school systems track student attendance during virtual learning. Taking attendance while students are learning from home will assist school staff in ensuring that all students have the resources and support students need to engage in learning. Tracking attendance will include a combination of measures that indicate a student is demonstrating their engagement in learning. Elementary teachers will complete daily attendance for their students. Middle and high school teachers will take class attendance for each period. An official DAILY attendance will be completed by designated school staff members by the end of each school day. The DAILY attendance will be recorded in the Aspen Management System for ACPS by the end of each school day.

    If needed during virtual or hybrid learning, any lag attendance data, via asynchronous learning through Schoology will be provided to the school’s office staff to update by the end of each school day. Additional information on attendance procedures for the ACPS is listed below the definitions.

     

    Attendance Definitions and Requirements

     

    Lawful Absence - Students shall be considered lawfully absent when absent from instruction with proper documentation approved by the principal/designee. During virtual learning, parents should call the school and provide a note (via email is acceptable) if the student will be absent from their virtual learning. Additional documentation, including a physician’s note, may be required for excessive absences.

    *Please understand that state auditors require a written note for lawful absences.*

     

    Unlawful Absence - Students shall be considered unlawfully absent when absent from instruction without submitting an absence note to the principal/designee. A student will be documented as unlawfully absent if the parent doesn’t call the school if the student will be absent from their virtual learning.

     

    Tardies and/or Early Dismissals - Please contact the school if your child will be tardy or will need an early dismissal during the Synchronous Learning.

    Makeup Work - Your child will be expected to make up any missed assignments due to an absence, tardy, or early dismissal. Teachers will provide students with their classroom requirements for makeup work.

     

     

    Synchronous - “Live” or “Real Time’ during the scheduled time frame. Students attend the class during its scheduled time.

     

    Asynchronous - Does not occur in the same place or at the same time. Students access the recorded lesson at a later time.

     

    Present - A student will be marked as present when there is evidence of daily “live” engagement in their classes via the Schoology platform and/or conference tools through typical class attendance procedures.

     

    Absent - A student will be marked as absent when there is no evidence of daily engagement in the “live” online Schoology classroom. (Please see the exceptions below.)

     

    Students must log in to their classes on any scheduled virtual learning days (Asynchronous and/Synchronous  on a daily basis to be counted present in a class.)

     

    • A parent/student who doesn’t have any Internet connectivity and cannot login to Schoology through ‘live” or archived lessons.
    • If a hotspot can address a connectivity issue, the student will not be

    permitted to use an alternative form of instruction.

     

    * Please note that you will receive a daily phone call about an absence. Please be patient and kind to ACPS staff if you receive a phone call. Please note that school officials and Pupil Personnel Workers will be contacting parents/guardians if a student begins accumulating absences.

     

    The district will continue to send out attendance letters per the BOE policy

     

    Attendance Procedures

     

    In the event that the district moves to a virtual learning environment, elementary teachers will complete a daily attendance for their students. Middle and high school teachers will take class attendance for each period.  An official DAILY attendance will be completed by designated school staff members by the end of each school day. The DAILY attendance will be recorded in the Aspen Management System for ACPS by the end of each school day. Any lag attendance data, via asynchronous learning through Schoology will be provided to the school’s office staff to update by the end of each school day.

    For a hybrid and for the traditional learning environments, the administrators and teachers will maintain the attendance system used to record and report pupil absences as indicated below.

     

    School Procedures - Recognizing administrators’ and teachers’ responsibility for developing and maintaining a system to record and report pupil absences (lawful and unlawful), the following procedures are minimal for all schools: 1. Teachers will maintain daily attendance records for all students and report tardiness and absence information as well as suspected truancies. 2. All students’ report cards will report the number of days absent from school. 3. School personnel should contact the parent/guardian/caretaker when a student is absent or when an instance of truancy from school or class is suspected. 4. A note from the parent/guardian or physician explaining the absence/tardiness of a student should be received by the school within two school days following the student’s return or the absence/tardiness will be coded as unlawful. When a doctor’s certificate for chronic illness is required and not provided within two school days following the student’s return, the absence/tardiness will be coded as unlawful until the note is submitted.

    Students Leaving Early From School

    All students leaving prior to the regular dismissal time may only do so with prior written permission from the parent/guardian. All early dismissal students must be dismissed from the building via the school office. The parent/guardian who is seeking the early dismissal will receive the child in the main office following procedures which will include the signature of the parent/guardian or a pre-authorization letter from the parent/guardian. The parent/guardian must also provide the time and reason for early dismissal, which shall be entered on the school early dismissal log. Parents are asked to call the school if the student will be absent from a class in the virtual learning environment.

     

    Monitoring Problems/Consequences of Absenteeism

     

    During virtual, hybrid, or traditional learning, schools have individuals assigned to monitor and address attendance documentation and issues. The school system will be responsible for notifying parents/students of accumulated absences and possible actions as specified below. However, when the principal or his/her designee has knowledge of the student’s illness, principals are advised to forward the communication to the parent with an appropriate addendum referencing the principal’s knowledge of the circumstances. During the virtual and hybrid models, teachers have a designated office support hour to contact parents whose students were absent from the synchronous or asynchronous learning. Teachers are permitted to facilitate 1:1 teleconferences with students/parents to address attendance, engagement, and/or academic issues. All schools have been provided with the protocols for documenting attendance calls and teleconferences through a school log. In addition, administrators, pupil personnel workers (PPWs), school counselors, and other support staff have been tasked with contacting students who are consistently marked absent. The PPWs and the School Resource Officers are also tasked with conducting home visits to students who are habitually absent or chronically truant. Every school has a Pupil Services Team (Attendance/Discipline Team) that meets either in-person or virtually every week. The team communicates attendance issues and works to address any attendance concerns. Teleconferences and in-person conferences are coordinated to address students who are consistently marked absent.

     

    When a student accumulates five (5) days of unlawful absences, parents/students will be notified by written communication from the school system. The case will be referred to the school attendance/discipline team which shall be composed of the principal or his/her designee, the school’s pupil personnel worker and other staff members assigned by the principal. The committee may invite the student’s parents to come to the school for a conference and to determine available courses of action to improve attendance. It may be feasible to hold a phone or virtual teleconference.

    If unlawful absences continue, the parent will be notified by written communication from the school system, no later than the ninth (9) day of unlawful absence. Within this written communication, the parent will be asked to schedule a conference with the school administration and or the school pupil services team. iii. If unlawful absences continue, the parent will be notified again by the school system in writing, no later than immediately after the twelfth (12th) day of unlawful absence. The school system will send a written communication by mail. A conference with the parent and/or the student will be held.

    At the conference, the principal or designee may indicate one or more of the following outcomes as a result of the conference: 1. Establishing a probationary period with verbal agreement 2. Developing a written contract (to be signed by the parent) 3. Assigning to after-school detention 4. Assigning additional days of attendance 5. Removing school privileges 6. Restricting extracurricular activities 7. The explanation given to the parent of the criteria for, and the services provided to a student who may qualify for Home and Hospital Services, if appropriate, given the situation surrounding the student’s absences. 8. Written notification to the parent will be immediately mailed to the parent, confirming the above action(s) taken iv.

     

    When a student accumulates a total of twenty (20) absences, with at least fifteen (15) of those absences being unlawful, or ten (10) consecutive unlawful absences, the school’s PPW will file charges with the State’s Attorney’s Office against the parent/guardian and/or the student for nonattendance. This action will be confirmed in a letter written by the PPW to the parent/guardian. The letter will also indicate additional consequences issued by the school which may include: 1. Retention in the grade (grades K through 8). 2. For students in grades 9-12 who have accumulated a total of 15 unlawful absences, denial of high school credit for the courses in which the student is currently enrolled. Denial of credit will normally occur in June; however, a student and parent shall receive written notice of the possibility of credit loss at the time the attendance/ discipline committee makes this determination. High school credits may be denied for individual courses if there are excessive unlawful absences. ATTENDANCE POLICY FILE: JED – R5 absences.

     

     

    ATTENDANCE MOTIVATION SUGGESTIONS

     

    Schools may: A. Develop and utilize positive rewards for pupils with exceptional attendance records during any one grading period and/or for the school year. B. Send quarterly commendation letters to students and parents for perfect attendance and improved attendance. C. Develop school-wide incentive programs to improve attendance.

     

     

     

    COVID 19 Attendance Collection and Recording- Key Considerations and Frequently Asked Questions.

    Please note this information is considered a working document by MSDE and will be updated and disseminated as needed.

    Are local school systems still required to track student attendance? COMAR 13A.08.01.01.E requires that “A record of the daily attendance of each student” be kept in accordance with regulations of the State Board of Education and the Maryland Student Records System Manual.

    How do we maintain daily attendance when our students are not in school buildings? Local school systems should carefully consider how their student attendance policies may be adapted to include recording daily attendance during remote learning. Local school systems should consider the needs and priorities of their systems in determining the best ways to record daily attendance. Specific attendance expectations should be communicated to stakeholders and included in the system’s student attendance policy.

    How must student attendance be tracked by local school systems? COMAR 13A.08.01.05 requires local school systems to develop a student attendance policy that includes reasons for lawful and unlawful absence as defined in COMAR 13A.08.01.03.03 and 13A.08.01.04. 04. Local school systems should ensure their attendance policies support their remote learning plan.

    What currently defines “present” or “absent”? COMAR 13A.08.01.01.D states that “students shall be considered in attendance at school when participating in school-sponsored activities during the school day, and when that participation is approved by the local superintendent of schools or the school principal, or their designees.” The Maryland Student Records System Manual allows for a student to be counted present if engaged in activity sponsored by the school and personally supervised by school personnel. This may include authorized independent study, work-study programs, field trips, athletic events, contests, music festivals, student conventions, instruction for homebound students, and similar activities when officially authorized under policies of the local school board. Local school systems should ensure their attendance and absence policy accommodates any changes in student location and expectations for student attendance during the period of remote learning.

    Could the local school system develop absence codes specifically for use during the COVID-19 pandemic? Yes, a local school system may develop more granular absence codes than the codes identified in the Maryland Student Records Systems Manual. If the local school system develops additional codes, the system’s student attendance policy should identify the alignment between the COMAR defined codes and the system developed codes. Academic Year 2021 as of July 17, 2020, 2 DAAIT-OOA Office of Accountability Frequently Asked Questions COVID-19 Attendance Collection and Reporting (2020-2021)

    What documentation should be retained, in anticipation of any future audits, to prove that we have been providing instruction during remote learning? Local school systems should retain any information that may be used to prove that instruction was provided during remote learning. This could include any recorded contact with students, documentation of contact with students, receipts for distribution of materials, examples of take home work, school work or activities collected during remote learning, retired student packets, etc. Each local school system should identify the artifacts that may be used in the case of an audit.

    If there are concerns regarding appropriate documentation contact MSDE Audit Office. References Annotated Code of Maryland Md. Ann. Code, Ed. Art., §2-205(o) Authority of the State Board Md. Ann. Code, Ed. Art., §7-101 Public School Attendance Md. Ann. Code, Ed. Art., §7-301 Compulsory Age of Attendance Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) COMAR 13A.02.06 General Financial Aid to Local School Systems COMAR 13A.02.06.02 Definitions COMAR 13A.08.01 General Regulations COMAR 13A.08.01.01 Attendance COMAR 13A.08.01.05 Student Attendance Policy COMAR 13A.08.01.03.03 Lawful Absence COMAR 13A.08.01.04. 04 Unlawful Absence COMAR 13A.08.01.07 Student Withdrawal Status COMAR 13A.08.02 Student Records Resources.

     

     

    Operations Safety Protocols

     

    ACPS has the following Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for staff and students as needed: masks, face shields, gloves, gowns, wipes, hand sanitizer, and hand soap.

     

    Cleaning/Disinfecting/Sanitizing

     

    ACPS will follow safety procedures that are developed by MSDE in collaboration with the Maryland Department of Health and CDC Guidance to ensure that the cleaning, disinfecting, and sanitizing of all ACPS facilities will be in accordance with the CDC guidelines. Disinfectants will be EPA approved.

     

    Training

     

    Custodial staff will receive training on COVID 19 prevention practices.

     

    Disinfecting areas used by a sick person

     

    Response action after person suspected/confirmed to have COVID-19 have been to facility:

     

    • Identify and close off areas visited by a person ill/suspected/confirmed of COVID-19
    • Increase outside air ventilation by opening doors, windows, or ventilation fans.
    • Custodial staff should clean and disinfect all areas visited by the person.
    • Custodial staff should clean and disinfect all shared equipment used by the person.

     

    Disinfect using products on the EPA’s List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2

    (COVID-19) at their recommended label rate.

     

    Cleaning and disinfecting products include

     

    1. Germicidal Neutral Cleaner
    2. Heavy-Duty Cleaner
    3. Heavy-Duty Restroom Cleaner
    4. Spray disinfectants
    5. Electrostatic sprayers

     

         Process for Cleaning and Disinfecting of Building

     

    ACPS will follow CDC Guidelines for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplace’s, Businesses, Schools, and Homes.

     

    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be provided to all custodians and other staff responsible for cleaning and disinfecting.

     

    Disinfect using products on the EPA’s List N: Disinfectants for use against SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) at their recommended label rate.

     

    Process of Addressing Surfaces, Touch Points

     

    Hard surfaces will be cleaned daily using the following products:

     

    1. Germicidal Neutral Cleaner
    2. Heavy Duty Cleaner
    3. Heavy-Duty Restroom Cleaner
    4. Spray disinfectants
    5. Electrostatic sprayers

     

    Touch points will be cleaned and disinfected during the school day/workday. Examples:

     

    1. Door Handles/Door knobs
    2. Countertops
    3. Bathroom Fixtures
    4. Handrails
    5. Tables/Desks

     

    School buildings will be cleaned and disinfected each with emphasis placed on surfaces, which are frequently touched throughout the day.

     

    Instructional Staff Cleaning Supplies

     

    Each classroom will be supplied with the following:

    1. PPE
    2. KimTech Wipers with an approved disinfectant.
    3. Spray bottle with approved disinfectant and microfiber cleaning cloths that will be replaced daily.
    4. Hand sanitizer
    5. Hand soap and paper towels where sinks are located.

     

    The provision of these items is to make such supplies more widely available to instructional staff and is not intended as a directive to clean classrooms.

     

     

    Shared Objects/Equipment

          Any equipment or supplies that students share will be cleaned in-between uses.

          Staff identified to clean shared equipment/supplies will be supplied PPE and instruction on procedures for cleaning.

     

    Food and Nutrition

     

    Food Services:

      • Students will receive access to the nutrition services to which they are entitled.
      • Nutritional services should be made available to students and families on any day that they are attending school.
      • Food may be eaten in classrooms and/or the cafeteria. Cafeterias may be used to stage students who will be purchasing lunch at the school.
      • When waiting to be served, face masks are strongly encouraged to be worn and social distancing shall be respected. Students who wear a mask to school will be socially distanced six feet from other students when eating per current guidance.
      • Cash shall not be used to purchase meals.
      • Have children bring their own meals as feasible, or serve individually plated meals in classrooms, if feasible, instead of in a communal dining hall or cafeteria, while ensuring the safety of children with food allergies.
      • Enforce strict handwashing with soap and water after food contact.
      • Ensure there is a “do not share” food policy among students.
      • Before school resumes, teachers and school leaders review food allergies and 504 plans for all children with food allergies.
      • Teachers should refresh their understanding of food allergies, including symptoms of allergic reactions to food.
      • Use disposable food service items (e.g., utensils, dishes) as needed. If disposable items are not feasible or desirable, ensure that all non-disposable food service items are handled with gloves and washed with dish soap and hot water or in a dishwasher. Individuals should wash their hands after removing their gloves or after directly handling used food service items.
      • If food is offered at any event, consider using pre-packaged boxes or bags for each attendee.
      • Avoid sharing food and utensils and ensure the safety of children with food allergies.

     

     

    In the event of a Full Virtual Model or Blended Virtual Learning Program

     

    1. Meals will be picked up at schools accordingly Monday – Friday.  The sites and timeframes will be announced to parents and students.
    2. Sites may be determined and communicated to parents/students.
    3. Staff handing out meals while maintaining social distancing guidelines will wear

    masks/gloves.

    1. Student meal accounts will be charged per paid, reduced, or free rate.
    2. Classroom rosters will be used to account for the meals.
    3. Breakfast and lunch will be served to each student.

     

    Hybrid Model

     

    1. Staff will wear masks/gloves.
    2. Breakfast will be served in a bag as students arrive at school.
    3. Students will be lined up per the social distancing requirements provided by the MDH.
    4. Hand sanitizers will be available in each dining room.
    5. Milk will be handed out to students with assistance from staff members.
    6. Students will go through the line to pick up their bag/milk accordingly.
    7. Barcodes or classroom rosters will be used to account for the meals per paid, reduced or free rate.
    8. Payment will only be accepted before school begins in the cafeteria. Money can also be added to student accounts online through paypams.com.
    9. No ala carte items will be sold other than milk needed for those students with packed lunches that will still go through the line to purchase.
    10. Students will sit in the cafeteria/classroom depending on the location.
    11. Lunch will be served in a bag along with milk.
    12. Lunch shifts may vary per school to include cleaning of tables between shifts.

     

    Quarantines

     

    Describes the process to communicate quarantine procedures to students, staff, and the community

     

    The ACPS will not be quarantining students. 

    If the ACPS should return to quarantining students, then the ACPS, in collaboration with the Allegany County Health Department, will follows the MDH/MSDE Guidance for Covid-19 Symptoms, Isolation, and Quarantine.  ACPS posts the guidance document, as well as other Covid related information, to the ACPS website at https://www.acpsmd.org/Page/3159.  The ACPS provides any updated guidelines or information on the website and this information is conveyed to employees and parents. 

     

    Identifies the delivery of instruction to continue learning for all students in quarantine

     

    Not applicable since the ACPS will not be quarantining students.

     

    Describes the process to record attendance, engage students, provide and collect assignments, record grades, and provide technical support for students in quarantine.

     

    Not applicable since the ACPS will not be quarantining students.

     

    Identifies staff that will support instruction of students who are in quarantine.

     

    Not applicable.

     

    Describes protocols that will be implemented to ensure the continuity of instruction for students with service plans (IEP, 504, etc.) during the period of quarantine

     

    Not applicable.

     


     

    Addendum

    Guidance to Support PK-12 and Decision Tree - Dated July 2022

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

    This is a letter from State Superintendent to Local Schools regarding guidance to support safe in-person operations for PK-12 schools and child care programs.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Maryland Department of  Health and MSDE Guidance for COVD-19 Symptoms, Isolation, and Quarantine Chart.

     

    Appendix 

    (Please refer to the assessment information beginning on page 15 and the implementation plan on page 24,)

    Fall 2021 - Allegany County State Assessment Data Results

    ACPS performance levels for subgroups for ELA Grade 3 through Grade 10; and subgroups Math Grade 3 through Grade 8, including Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

    ELA

    *Elementary Reading/ELA Student Outcome and Projected Data

    KindergartenThe data table includes reading screening scores for kindergarten students, with categories of Above Benchmark, At Benchmark, Below Benchmark, and Well Below Benchmark.  The table includes outcome data for the 2021-2022 school year as well as projected growth for the 2022-2023 year.  Data is disaggregated by race, gender, special education status, and FARMS.  Scores indicate substantial growth from 2021 fall to 2022 spring, with over 20% increase in the total population of kindergarten students as well as the subgroups.  An additional 5% growth for spring 2023 is projected.

     

    Grade 1The data table includes reading screening scores for grade one students, with categories of Above Benchmark, At Benchmark, Below Benchmark, and Well Below Benchmark.  The table includes outcome data for the 2021-2022 school year as well as projected growth for the 2022-2023 year.  Data is disaggregated by race, gender, special education status, and FARMS.  Scores indicate substantial growth from 2021 fall to 2022 spring, with over 20% increase in the total population of grade one students as well as the subgroups.  An additional 5% growth for spring 2023 is projected.

    Grade 2The data table includes reading screening scores for grade two students, with categories of Above Benchmark, At Benchmark, Below Benchmark, and Well Below Benchmark.  The table includes outcome data for the 2021-2022 school year as well as projected growth for the 2022-2023 year.  Data is disaggregated by race, gender, special education status, and FARMS.  Scores indicate  growth from 2021 fall to 2022 spring, with increases in the total population of grade two students as well as the subgroups.  An additional 5% growth for spring 2023 is projected.

    Grade 3The data table includes reading screening scores for grade three students, with categories of Above Benchmark, At Benchmark, Below Benchmark, and Well Below Benchmark.  The table includes outcome data for the 2021-2022 school year as well as projected growth for the 2022-2023 year.  Data is disaggregated by race, gender, special education status, and FARMS.  Scores indicate slight growth from 2021 fall to 2022 spring, with small increases in the total population of grade three students as well as the subgroups.  An additional 5% growth for spring 2023 is projected.

    Grade 4The data table includes reading screening scores for grade four students, with categories of Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic.  The table includes outcome data for the 2021-2022 school year as well as projected growth for the 2022-2023 year.  Data is disaggregated by race, gender, special education status, and FARMS.  Scores indicate growth from 2021 fall to 2022 spring, with a substantial  increase in the total population of grade four students as well as slight increases in most subgroups. An additional 5% growth for spring 2023 is projected.

    Grade 5The data table includes reading screening scores for grade five students, with categories of Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic.  The table includes outcome data for the 2021-2022 school year as well as projected growth for the 2022-2023 year.  Data is disaggregated by race, gender, special education status, and FARMS.  Scores indicate growth from 2021 fall to 2022 spring, with a substantial  increase in the total population of grade four students as well as increases in most subgroups. An additional 5% growth for spring 2023 is projected.

     

    Secondary Reading/ELA and Outcome Data (Middle School)

    ACPS Grade 6 Reading Data-Diagnostic Monitoring for Fall 2021 using Reading Inventory for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities.

     

     

    ACPS Grade 6 Reading Data-Progress Monitoring for Spring 2022 using Reading Inventory for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities. The chart also includes End of Year (EOY) growth targets for the Spring of 2022 and projected growth for the 2022-2023 academic year.

     

     

     

    ACPS Grade 7 Reading Data-Diagnostic Monitoring for Fall 2021 using Reading Inventory for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities.

    ACPS Grade 7 Reading Data-Progress Monitoring for Spring 2022 using Reading Inventory for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities. The chart also includes End of Year (EOY) growth targets for the Spring of 2022 and projected growth for the 2022-2023 academic year.

    ACPS Grade 8 Reading Data-Diagnostic Monitoring for Fall 2021 using Reading Inventory for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities.

     

     

    ACPS Grade 8 Reading Data-Progress Monitoring for Spring 2022 using Reading Inventory for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Advanced, Proficient, Basic, and Below Basic categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities. The chart also includes End of Year (EOY) growth targets for the Spring of 2022 and projected growth for the 2022-2023 academic year.

     

     

     

     

    Secondary Reading/ELA and Outcome Data (High School)

    ACPS Grade 9 Reading Data-Diagnostic Monitoring for Fall 2021 using Reading Growth Measure for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Above, On, Approaching, and Below categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities.

     

     

     

    ACPS Grade 9 Reading Data-Progress Monitoring for Spring 2022 using Growth Reading Measure for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Above, On, Approaching, and Below categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities. The chart also includes End of Year (EOY) growth targets for the Spring of 2022 and projected growth for the 2022-2023 academic year.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ACPS Grade 10 Reading Data-Diagnostic Monitoring for Fall 2021 using Reading Growth Measure for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Above, On, Approaching, and Below categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities.

     

     

     

     

    ACPS Grade 10 Reading Data-Progress Monitoring for Spring 2022 using Growth Reading Measure for all students. Data is based on students who scored in the Above, On, Approaching, and Below categories and is disaggregated by gender, race, and students with disabilities. The chart also includes End of Year (EOY) growth targets for the Spring of 2022 and projected growth for the 2022-2023 academic year.

     

     

    Gifted and Talented

    Data charts are not available at this time, but will be added as soon as they are completed.

    Math

    *Elementary Math and Outcome Data

    This chart shows the diagnostic and progress data, broken down by demographics, for students in Grades K through Grade 5 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year, including student proficiency projections for the 2022-2023 school year.

     

     

    Secondary Math and Outcome Data (Middle School)

    This chart shows the diagnostic and progress data, broken down by demographics, for students in Grade 6 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year, including student proficiency projections for the 2022-2023 school year.

     

    This chart indicates if goals established for Grade 6 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year were achieved. Green highlight indicates the goal was met, red highlight indicates the goal was not met.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This chart shows the diagnostic and progress data, broken down by demographics, for students in Grade 7 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year, including student proficiency projections for the 2022-2023 school year.

    This chart indicates if goals established for Grade 7 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year were achieved. Green highlight indicates the goal was met, red highlight indicates the goal was not met.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This chart shows the diagnostic and progress data, broken down by demographics, for students in Grade 8 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year, including student proficiency projections for the 2022-2023 school year.

    This chart indicates if goals established for Grade 8 Mathematics for the 2021-2022 school year were achieved. Green highlight indicates the goal was met, red highlight indicates the goal was not met.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This chart shows the diagnostic and progress data, broken down by demographics, for students in Middle School Algebra 1 for the 2021-2022 school year, including student proficiency projections for the 2022-2023 school year.

    This chart indicates if goals established for Middle School Algebra 1 for the 2021-2022 school year were achieved. Green highlight indicates the goal was met, red highlight indicates the goal was not met.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Secondary Math and Outcome Data (High School)

    This chart shows the diagnostic and progress data, broken down by demographics, for students in High School Algebra 1 and Integrated Algebra for the 2021-2022 school year, including student proficiency projections for the 2022-2023 school year.

    This chart indicates if goals established for High School Algebra 1 and Integrated Algebra for the 2021-2022 school year were achieved. Green highlight indicates the goal was met, red highlight indicates the goal was not met.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Science

    *Elementary Science

    100% of Allegany County teachers in grades K-5 Covered ech Science and Engineering Practice a minimum of 5 times during the 2021-2022 academic year. 

    *Secondary Science

    This chart shows the Fall of 2021 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for middle school science.It is broken down by the total of all grades, 6th-grade, and 7th-grade, and also by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    This is a continuation of the previous chart. This chart shows the Fall of 2021 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for middle school science.It contains 8th-grade data broken down by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    This chart shows the Spring of 2022 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for middle school science.It is broken down by the total of all grades, 6th-grade, and 7th-grade, and also by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    This is a continuation of the previous chart. This chart shows the Spring of 2022 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for middle school science.It contains 8th-grade data broken down by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    This chart shows the Fall of 2021 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for high school science.It is broken down by the total of all grades in the three required subject areas, Earth Space Science, Biology, and Chemistry. It is also separated by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    Continuation of the Chemistry grades from the previous chart. This chart shows the Fall of 2021 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for high school science.It is broken down by the total of all grades in the three required subject areas, Earth Space Science, Biology, and Chemistry. It is also separated by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

     

     

    This chart shows the Spring of 2022 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for high school science.It is broken down by the total of all grades in the three required subject areas, Earth Space Science, Biology, and Chemistry. It is also separated by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    Continuation fo previous chart. This chart shows the Spring of 2022 school year proficiency rates of students in Allegany County public school for high school science.It is broken down by the total of all grades in the three required subject areas, Earth Space Science, Biology, and Chemistry. It is also separated by demographics including male/female, Race, Special Education and 505 status.

    Secondary Science Outcome DataThis chart shows the Secondary Science Projected outcomes, the Actual Outcomes, and a description of the Results for the 2022-23 School year in science classes. It also includes Projections for 2022-23 School year. The chart is broken down by grade and high school course. It is color coded and includes a key to assist with understanding the results.

    Continuation of the previous chart:This chart shows the Secondary Science Projected outcomes, the Actual Outcomes, and a description of the Results for the 2022-23 School year in science classes. It also includes Projections for 2022-23 School year. The chart is broken down by grade and high school course. It is color coded and includes a key to assist with understanding the results.

    Continuation of the previous chart:This chart shows the Secondary Science Projected outcomes, the Actual Outcomes, and a description of the Results for the 2022-23 School year in science classes. It also includes Projections for 2022-23 School year. The chart is broken down by grade and high school course. It is color coded and includes a key to assist with understanding the results.

    This key describes the color-coding used in the charts above.

     

    SEL

    Data charts are not available at this time.

    Social Studies

    2021-2022 School Year:

    Elementary Social Studies - The “Primary Source Feedback Data” can now be accessed via the following link.  The linked document contains feedback for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th marking periods.

    Elementary Social Studies Primary Source Feedback Data - Click here

    Secondary Social Studies - The “Grade Chart” and the “Projected Student Outcome Chart” can now be accessed via the following link.  Additional data (i.e. 4th quarter grades) is also included in the linked document.

    Secondary Social Studies Outcome Data - Click here

     

    2022-2023 School Year:

    Elementary Social Studies - Students will continue to be exposed to a variety of primary sources documents in order to develop their knowledge, skills, and analytical abilities.  Such skills are incorporated into all units of study, and it is therefore expected that the primary sources analysis process will result in raising students’ overall grades.

    Goal: The overall average semester grade for all students and subgroups will increase by at least 3% from the first semester to the second semester and/or the overall average grade for all students and subgroups will be at least 70.00%.  This projection will be updated, and additional data will be included, once semester grades are released (February 2023).  To view current elementary student demographic data, please click the following link.

    Elementary Student Demographic Data

     

    Secondary Social Studies - Students will continue to be exposed to mini-DBQs through the “DBQ Online” application.  The knowledge, skills, and analytical abilities that students acquire by working through the DBQ writing process are incorporated into all units of study, and it is therefore expected that the mini-DBQ process will result in raising students’ overall grades.

    Goal:  The overall average semester grade for all students and subgroups will increase by at least 3% from the first semester to the second semester and/or the overall average grade for all students and subgroups will be at least 70.00%.  This projection will be updated, and additional data will be included, once semester grades are released (February 2023).  To view current secondary student demographic data, please click the following link.

    Secondary Student Demographic Data